MUD Celebrates our Emmy Nominated Winner: Emma Faulkes

Emma Faulkes

Despite its fantastical premise, watching Game of Thrones always feels very real. Whether you’re watching the death of your favorite character or a battle between two others, computer and prosthetic special effects blend seamlessly, giving birth to one of the most captivating fantasy TV shows of our generation. Special Make-up Effects Artist, Emma Faulkes, was part of the team whhelped bring this television fantasy to life. 

Emma Faulkes recently won an Emmy for Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Limited Series, Movie or Special for her work on Game of Thrones’ seventh season. Starting out as a trainee for Nick Dudman on the set of Harry Potter: The Deathly Hallows, Faulkes has always been drawn towards prosthetic effects. “I couldn’t believe how lucky I was to be surrounded by so much talent on one of the greatest franchises in film history,” she says about the job, defining it as the moment she knew she needed to be a make-up artist. In fact, she had already studied make-up in the UK for two years before coming to MUD, searching for a class that was “solely prosthetics-based” and “was 100% focused on hands on practical learning.” Luckily for us, MUD served her needs. 

But her time at MUD wasn’t all work, and she has some fond memories, too. When asked to share her favorite story, she recalled a time where her make-up kit was stolen out of the trunk of her car and her instructor, along with others all pitched in to replace it. “It was an act of kindness that I will never forget,” she says, describing her instructor, Mark Shostromas “an incredible FX artist,” and “the reason I travelled all the way from the UK to Los Angeles.” In fact, she even stopped by our Los Angeles school just last week to say hello to the staff! We are very excited about Emma’s success, and proud to say she is a MUD grad.

 

MUD Talks: An Interview with Vincent Van Dyke

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Vincent Van Dyke is an industry leader in special make-up effects. Getting his first job at just 14 years old, Vincent Van Dyke has gone on to work on TV shows and movies like I Tonya, Darkest Hour, Code Black, and Dexter. Acting as the owner and creative director of Vincent Van Dyke Effects at only 28 years old, Vincent Van Dyke has now moved to the Burman studio space where he learned the tools of the trade.

Despite being so much younger than his peers, Vincent Van Dyke says his career has always progressed in “gradual baby steps.” From experimenting with a make-up kit at six years old, to introducing himself to Barney Burman at an FX supply store, to working with Kazu on Darkest Hour, Vincent Van Dyke’s career has blossomed in a way many young make-up artists can only dream of. We spoke with him about approaching your make-up artist idols, living your passion, and knowing when to take your next big career step.

MUD: What was the defining moment when you knew you wanted to be a make-up artist?

VINCENT: That’s such a hard question for me because it goes back so far. My step-dad was a huge film aficionado, so he was really big into old black and white silent movies and all that stuff. I remember one night in particular I was going to bed and he had the original Hunchback playing and I was mesmerized by it. I could barely go to sleep because I was like ‘oh my god I want to do that!’ When I woke up in the morning I got my little makeup kit out and I duplicated that makeup on myself. I don’t remember when I first got this little kit or how I put it together, but I had it already. That was one of those moments where I got silly putty and I got a pillow and I shoved it in my back and I made this little face. It was really a fun make-up to do. There’s a picture of it somewhere that my mom has I’m sure.

MUD: How old were you?

VINCENT: I was probably six when I did that–that’s what’s weird. I had no idea what I was doing; I just knew it was fun. My mom would always be so encouraging and so supportive. I would say “how does this person look like this?” And she would go “oh well it’s makeup and I don’t really know how to answer that question, honey.” My association with makeup was what my mom put on her face so I was like “well that doesn’t make any sense!”

MUD: I read online that you were reading a lot of books and watching a lot of videos about special make-up effects early on. Which ones in particular?

VINCENT: I was reading a lot of Vincent Kehoe’s Special Make-Up Effects. It’s funny because I found it recently and it has all these little highlighted notes and post-its. It looks like a textbook, you know? The internet was in its absolute infancy, so I was literally going through books and getting VHS tapes. Michael Burnett had a line of VHS tapes that were huge for me. I watched those over and over and over again.

MUD: You met Barney Burman at an FX supply store, correct?

VINCENT: He was there shopping and I showed him my portfolio, and maybe six months after that he gave me a job. It was my first internship, which was amazing. Then later on, maybe one and a half or two years after that, I went over to Tom and Bari Burman’s shop. That was when my career took off. You know, you have your job and then you have like your career. It was really like they honed me in and guided my eye. I can’t imagine any other company ever doing that for me. I was so, so lucky to have fell into that position at that time in that month and the universe–just everything aligned and it just worked amazingly.

 

MUD: What was it like working that young?

VINCENT: Oh it’s ridiculous! It’s weird to be paid for something that you absolutely love. I think that’s honestly still hard for me to grasp, because so many people have to work to live but when you live to work and you really just have this amazing passion that you get paid for–that’s so rare. It was hard for me to fathom like ‘oh I’m getting a paycheck for playing with the stuff that I played with already for so many years as a little kid.’

MUD: I bet that a lot of people reading this will wonder how you were able to just strike up a conversation with a potential employer. Do you have any tips for approaching a big make-up artist?

VINCENT: I always had my portfolio with me. So no matter where I went, especially if I was going to a make-up store, I always had a little portfolio. You never know who you’re going to run into. I would just go up to them and say ‘hey, I know who you are, and I would love to show you my portfolio. I hate to interrupt you.’ I can’t imagine anybody in this business going ‘I don’t have time for this like get out of my face.’ Everyone’s going to take a minute to look at your portfolio, especially if you’re coming up to them, and you’re polite, and you’re just asking for them to look at your stuff, not asking for a job. I wasn’t really thinking about having a job.

MUD: When did you know that you wanted to have your own studio?

VINCENT: It’s funny because I think a lot of people maybe discover that they want their own studio after working for people, but I knew from when I was little. I really loved this stuff, and I knew that one day (I just thought it was going to be when I was 50), I want to be able to have the stuff produced under my roof be something I’m really proud of. When it happened I had no idea that I was ready for it. I don’t think you ever know that you’re ready for a move like that. But the way that everything had aligned–I had been working at the Burman’s for around 8 years, and I eventually became their shop supervisor and creative director, and they had really groomed me to be in a position like that. Bari Burman pushed me and my eye so much- really giving me a totally different perspective on the way I approached sculpture and paint. She and Tom are brilliant artists. And Tom Burman had such an ease about everything he did- always thinking outside the box and pushing the boundaries for the “standard” approach. Orchestrating teams, and working with extreme deadlines, I could go on and on but they really made it possible for me to have my own shop. It was a good time for me to be able to get a space and see what happens.

MUD: You’ve said it can be difficult to relinquish creative control once you start expanding. Do you have any advice for delegating tasks or collaborating?

VINCENT: I’ve been really fortunate that all the artists that I hire are all very collaborative. I never feel like somebody’s taking the bull by the horns and just saying like ‘this is how we’re doing it.’ It’s always a conversation of like ‘what’s the best way to get here?’ That was something that was instilled in me from Bari and Tom when I was working with them–like having these discussions and having open ideas of like ‘let’s take ego out of it and look at this situation and figure out the best way to do it.’ That to me is always the answer. Most of the time the answer for me is ‘that guy is way better at this than I am, so he’s going to do this.’ Sometimes it’s ‘I would love to sculpt this right now, but I’ve got my lead Daniele Tirinnanzi.’ He’s been my lead sculptor and painter now for a while, and he’s brilliant, so I always know that he’s going to do these things better than I am and it’s easy for me to relinquish that creative direction.

MUD: What is your favorite thing about your job?

VINCENT: I think that actually is my favorite thing about my job–that collaborative deal–because it’s so nice to be able to work with other artists that I learn from every day. For me the coolest thing is when I get to hire people that I think are so amazing at their job. Because I don’t shop hop around, I’m actually bringing people in that I get to look over their shoulder and learn from.
It’s cool to me when I can go ‘oh, I get to bring in Mitch Devane, who I think is the best sculptor in the business, to sculpt for me and he’s across from my office and I can just look in there and be like ‘wow Mitch Devane is sculpting the most amazing thing right now!’ That to me is kind of the coolest thing.

Thanks for talking with us, Vince!

Scott Essman and Mark Viniello Discuss Dick Smith’s Legacy for MUD Talks

You might recognize Dick Smith’s name for his work on Little Big Man, Amadeus, or Taxi Driver. Though he won an Oscar in 1985 for Best Makeup and Hairstyling for his work on Amadeus, his peers and proteges guess he would have won many more had the make-up award category even existed before 1981. For this reason, he also won an Academy Honorary Award for his career’s work in 2012.

Photo courtesy of IMATS

Nicknamed “The Godfather of Make-up” throughout the industry, Dick Smith pioneered many of the special make-up effects techniques we use today. The make-up for Little Big Man wasn’t just an old-age make-up, it was an old-age make-up that evolved to show the progression of over 100 years. He didn’t just do static bullet holes for The Godfather, but ones that bled and burst on screen. His make-up on Linda Blair for The Exorcist scared the audience so much, digital experts on movie remakes have attempted to recreate it. And, perhaps most memorably of all, David Bowie was so overwhelmed at the sight of his old age makeup for The Hunger that he left set for a full two days.

Photo courtesy of MonsterMovieKid.com

Writer, producer, and motion picture craftsmanship expert, Scott Essman, and special make-up effects artist, Mark Viniello, both came into contact with Dick Smith in very different ways. Taking up an interest in professional make-up artistry, Scott Essman was led to pursue Smith after hearing his name in interview after interview with other successful make-up artists. Viniello, on the other hand, pursued Smith as an aspiring make-up artist, mailing Smith copies of his work for months before Smith took him on as a student. Both talk about how they had to wear him down before he would take them seriously, contacting him repeatedly for information and advice. However, after years of collaboration, both came to consider Dick Smith a friend. Here are some of the most interesting things we learned:

  1. He’s responsible for multi-piece prosthetics. Back when make-up artists were using foam prosthetics in the 50s, these masks would have to be tugged and stretched to fit the actor’s face because the foam would shrink. This was very difficult and very uncomfortable for the actor because it was so hard to be expressive and move under the prosthetic. “Dick said there’s got to be a better way” says Viniello, “so what Dick reasoned is if there were little sections that overlapped, he could glue it on piece by piece and have a better glue down so the actor would be more comfortable and have more movability.” Now, years later, even though make-up artists all use silicone, Smith’s multi-piece prosthetic technique is still used.

    Photo courtesy of Lucy Amelia Thomas
  2. He was blatantly honest. When Viniello first approached Dick Smith for make-up advice, Smith told him he didn’t have “the skills you need to be a make-up artist.” After wearing him down by sending him continuous letters and photos, Smith eventually acknowledged his “drive” and and agreed to teach him. But, as Viniello says, “he didn’t sugar-coat anything,” and he developed a reputation for refusing to teach people he didn’t think would be worth the time. According to our host, he turned down Guillermo Del Toro as well.

    Photo courtesy of Dick Smith’s Special FX Training
  3. His attention to detail made him successful. When asked what set Dick Smith apart, both Viniello and Essman said it was his attention to detail. “Every wrinkle was based from a wrinkle in a photograph that he had up above his area where he was sculpting” says Essman. Viniello added that “he was never satisfied…not only artistically but also technically. He changed things to suit what he needed.” This attention to detail and perfectionism is likely why all his make-ups looked so real.

    Photo courtesy of Beauty and the Geek

 

 

 

Thanks for all your stories Scott and Mark!

Remembering Dick Smith

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“Dick Smith died last night…”

The first words I hear from my wife as I roll awake. I lay there trying to digest the words and acknowledge the emotional impact that will befall me, my friends, my students, my peers, my heroes and my industry. I never knew the man well enough to call him a friend. We shared many handshakes, a meal with friends and some kind words. I will forever be remorseful for not taking a moment to ask for a photo commemorating the memory of such an iconic man.

To his closest friends, colleagues and family, I have no words, only a ball of emotion that rolls through my throat, to my eyes then to sink back into the pit of my stomach leaving me feel empty and hollow. I knew what it was like to lose a father, and that’s who Dick was to many people in our industry. The rest of us knew him as a legend, a hero, the “Godfather of Make-up” as he was called, and we knew him as a teacher.

As a teacher, Dick Smith became a symbol of sharing, of guidance, of support, of professionalism, of talent… his work became the very defining marker by which so many make-ups were compared. His contributions and influence on the lives of generations of make-up artists will continue to reshape and define future generations of artists, artists who will never have known or met the man, but will be better artists because of the foundations he laid.

Thank you Dick Smith for being an inspiration to our heroes. Thank you Dick Smith for being my hero. Thank you for your humility and the positive influence you had on so many, many lives.

With sincere admiration and deepest regrets,

Gil Romero
MUD School Director

“What can I say? I loved him. He was a giving, generous, open, kind, amazing human being. He wanted to feed your passion for make-up, he wanted to help you do great work. I remember when I was 13 I asked Dick for his ager stipple formula. I called him on the phone and he was so kind. He went out of his way to make copies of the formula and sent it to me. You can’t find a single person that hasn’t been touched by his kindness. I really can’t put it into words. He’s a legend.”
Chad Washum, MUD Faculty

“Words are so inadequate to relay our thoughts about our dear friend, Dick Smith, and the sympathy and loss we feel on his passing. Not only did the industry lose its foremost innovator and unselfish proponent. But, the world has lost the epitome of kindness, warmth and humility. He has left an indelible mark in our hearts. Our greatest memories are the many times we just listened to his eloquent commentary of his unbelievable life at the many dinners we shared with him. We’ll miss him dearly. So long, Dick. ”
Andre’ & Jenny DiMino (ADM Tronics)

A forefather to his industry and craft. His mark was left on us all. He will forever be missed and never be forgotten. His gifts will surpass his physical life and his talents will surpass us all.
Much Respect Mr Smith
KarrieAnn Sillay, MUD Faculty

Your passion for make-up and sharing your knowledge is your legacy.
Paul Thompson, MUD Director of Education

As a teacher I see Dick Smith’s iconic imagery continue to influence new generations of make-up artists. Though the artist will be missed, the art lives on.
Lisa Leveridge, MUD Faculty

MUD at IMATS NY 2014

 

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The IMATS 2014 premiered this past Saturday at New York City’s Pier 94 in the heart of midtown Manhattan. Make-up artists and enthusiasts gathered to participate and view the festivities of the prestigious and highly anticipated event. Highlights included demos featuring multiple Mud Alumni, Make-up competitions and famous faces.

The show kicked off on Saturday with a prosthetic museum curated by MUD’s Special Make-up Effects Instructor Anthony Giordano. Various characters were featured from film, television and music videos for all attendees viewing delight. Giordano was assisted by a group of MUD alumnae including: Olivia Cui, Sky Vega and Alyssa Vandall.

Fans of the SYFY TV Series “Face Off” had the opportunity to pose for photos and view demos created by Face Off contestants and MUD alumni Catherine Pashen (Cat), Niko Gonzalez and Bethany Serpico. Cat and Niko presented their “Exo Bride” demo and Bethany created an alien-like creature, while show-goers snapped photos and asked for autographs.

MUD Instructor Kelly Budd also performed a demo and with the assistance of former student Korina Artemiadis, she unveiled her avant-garde beauty inspired character during the final hours of the event.

The show wrapped with the Battle of the Brushes character prosthetic competition featuring two MUD alumnae Renee Varela and April Townes as well as 8 other contestants, all competing for a cash prize and the opportunity to be featured in the IMATS Make-up Artist Magazine.

Fans also said goodbye to Face-Off contestants Cat and Nikko as they performed their final demo on Sunday featuring their demon inspired character.

Contributor: Stacia McCarthy

Industry Speaks: Jake Garber

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Oscar-nominated and Emmy winning make-up artist Jake Garber was our Industry Speaks guest last night. We caught him just before this self-proclaimed “road-dog” disappeared for the next seven months to transform people into gruesome Walkers for AMC’s uber-popular zombie series, The Walking Dead .

A room filled with students, staff and friends listened attentively for the secret of Garber’s drive, the inspiration for his creativity, the “a-ha” moment that led him to become a make-up artist.  His response: “It was a Halloween hobby gone bad.” That humorous statement set the tone for the rest of the hour while we sat back and enjoyed his colorful behind-the scenes stories and invaluable make-up tips from his experience working in a wide range of environments.

Before collecting a number of awards and nominations (see list here), Garber started his career in a way that’s familiar to many artists in the industry—by willing to work hard and learn from the pros. He credits Make-up Artist Gary Boham for giving him his start in make-up. He trained with Gary for about five years on a variety of projects and gained the fundamental skills that prepared him for his move to Los Angeles in 1989. When he arrived in L.A. , he was hired to work for Universal creating masks for characters like Frankenstein and Wolfman.  The job lead was through a connection Garber made years before.  “I met Mike Burnett at a convention. He said, ‘call me when you get to L.A.’ I called the day I arrived and got work pouring masks six days a week.” Every job he’s had since then has stemmed from making monsters at Universal.

Today, Jake Garber’s credits include Django Unchained, From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series, The Man with Iron Fists, Hellboy, Priest, Kill Bill: Vol 1 and 2, Predators and more.

Jake took us through his career reel and gave some great insight into the techniques used for each make-up and shared some on-set problem/solution scenarios you would never imagine. (Let’s just say his creative solutions, or ‘MacGuyver techniques’ once involved a cigarette filter and corn nuts to create a busted lip and broken teeth effect.)

Don’t miss out on the next Industry Speaks event! This is your chance to meet the most accomplished professionals in the industry, ask questions and hear the most inspiring behind-the scenes stories. Did you know that Quentin Tarantino was specific about the color of blood used on set? It has to be a certain type of bright red – thanks for the tip, Jake.

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What’s in Your FX kit?

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Make-up Artists often count on one another for technique tips, resource information and product recommendations. Although there is a lot of information on the Web, MUA’s have shared their knowledge on a peer-to-peer basis since the time when there were only few reference make-up application books and *gasp* no Internet. So, we asked Cat and Niko to share with us the contents of their FX kit and share with us why they’d recommend the products they use.

Niko Gonzalez and Cat Paschen, MUD grads and Face Off Season 6 contestants, what’s in YOUR FX kit?

Cat: We recently stopped by the MUD Burbank campus to give the students a lecture titled ‘What’s In Your FX Kit?’ and went over our FX kit necessities as well as our favorite brushes, tools and paints with the students.

Niko: We always stress the importance of over packing for any make-up job. You must always be prepared for anything. You never know what you will be asked to do on set, schedules change last minute all the time. It is better to have all of the basics packed and ready to go in your kit at all times. Below is a list of our FX kit necessities that we always keep in our kits.

Basics

We always carry a little bottle of latex and a jar of 3rd degree with us at all times. You can create almost anything with these two items- they are great for quick or unexpected FX that you might have to do on set from aging to injuries. Having a variety of different colors of dirt is great to have as well. Depending on the location you are shooting, the color of dirt and dust will change. Having different shades will give you a more realistic look. We also keep wax paper pallets, gloves, neutral set powder, thickened pros-aid cream, glycerin for sweat and a tear stick packed at all times.

Glues

We also recommend carrying small bottles of Spirit Gum, Pros-aide and Telesis 5. Pros-aide 1 is our favorite go-to glue because of its bond strength and price. However, it is important to have other glues such as spirit gum (which is the gentlest glue) in case the talent you are working on has an allergic reaction. Telesis is also great to use for quick fixes because it bonds instantly without having to wait for it to dry.

Blood

We keep a variety of different bloods with as well. They range in price, color and consistency to fit the look we need to achieve and the shot the director wants. Our go-to bloods include Fleet St. Drying Blood and Drying Past. The blood dries in place without cracking so it will not smear and ruin continuity. My Blood is also one of our favorites for a fresh, wet blood look.

Paints

We always have a few RMG wheels, basic cream colors as well as some alcohol palettes. The Ben Nye Bruise Wheel and Death wheels are my favorite go-to cream colors for FX. Alcohol activated palettes such as Skin Illustrator are our absolute favorite colors to use on set because we know they will last all day without smearing and can paint any kind of prosthetic. If we know we are doing a specific FX heavy project we will pack other paints such as water based paints and alcohol based air brush paints. Kyrolan, Wolf and Mehron Paradise colors are our favorite water based paints that are great for doing large surface areas fast.

The important thing is making sure you pack products that are multi-functional and work on a variety of materials/ skin types to save room in your kit. I find it fascinating to look through other make-up artist’s kits, I always learn about a new product and pick up a cool tip! Keep searching, practicing and experimenting with different products and find ones that work for you.

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Mark your calendars! Niko and Cat will be back at the Burbank campus with the rest of the local season 6 Face Off contestants on March 11th for lecture covering their experience on the show.

Keep up with this fantastic duo on their professional studio pages: DYADMUFX

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Face Off “In the Shadows” Episode 5 Win for MUD Grad Niko Gonzalez

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 Niko Gonzalez took the win for team MUD on the 5th episode of this season’s Face Off titled “In the Shadows.”  We sat down with Niko to discuss his winning make-up.

“Our challenge was to create a character based on a shadow of our choice. I was drawn to the shadow because of it’s big shape and the possible character I could create from it. I saw hair, hooves and horns and the silhouette reminded me of a bull. I also wanted to keep the human aspect in the make-up, so I decided to make a minotaur. I sculpted the face in 6 hours. On day two I sculpted the chest, 2 hooves, cowl molded everything and made the horns. The good thing about the cowl was that it did not need any detail, I ended up covering it with fur and used it just to provide bulk to the model to match the silhouette. On application day I had to open up the cowl, clean it out and run it in poly-foam. At the end of the first 4 hours I had everything and applied a base coat of paint on the model. I finished the rest of the painting and hair work in last looks. I am very proud of myself and what I was able to accomplish in such a short amount of time.” Niko Gonzalez

We’re proud of you too, Niko!

Watch Face Off on SyFy, Tuesdays at 9/8c and keep up with #teamMUD Twitter @mudschools Facebook @mudschools and Instagram @makeupdesignory.

Follow Niko on Instagram and Twitter // DYAD Make-up & FX Studio

Industry Speaks: Camden Toy

Gentlemen Camden Toy

Camden Toy is an actor, screenwriter, and editor whose love for acting and make-up runs deep into his childhood. He spent an afternoon with our students, graduates and fans discussing his passions, sharing his love of theater and theater performances, actors and artisans, make-ups and monsters.

Camden has had a fascination with the world of fantasy, classic horror and the make-ups that brought these characters to life from an early age. His father Malcolm was a make-up artist who had worked under Wally Westmore at the Paramount lot.

Camden shares a story of his first experiences with make-up. As a boy of no older than about 8 years old, his father found him rummaging through his make-up kit. Camden fondly recalls how his father leaned into him and quietly asks his son, “Do you want me to show you how to use that?”  Learning to apply old age make-up, with a putty nose and a fake beard, Camden’s lifelong love of make-up began.

“Dick Smith was a huge influence…” Camden describes how thrilling it was to transform himself into all sorts of characters and creatures using Dicks Smith’s Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-up Handbook.

Over the years, Camden has had his fair share of wearing all types of make-ups, but some of his most recognizable characters and monstrous creatures don’t resemble Camden at all. He has been described as a suit performer and character actor who has acted in over 100 independent films. On this afternoon, he shared his professional reel and photographs of his most outstanding and identifiable prosthetic characters on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel.

“I don’t like to think of myself as a suit performer. I like to think of myself as an actor who is able to integrate full prosthetic suits into my performance.”

Camden’s introduction to the Buffy the Vampire Slayer began with his principal role portraying one of the characters called the Gentleman on the episode “HUSH” This episode was one of the most highly rated and viewed episodes of the series and many would recognize his now infamous grin alongside his fellow Gentleman, Doug Jones.

Each of the make-ups Camden has worn for Buffy and Angel were designed so that he could fully express and act through the make-ups.  He explained how he appreciated the care and concern the make-up artists and craftsmen put into each aspect of developing the creatures, including contact lenses, claws and teeth.

“Almost Human had a wonderful dental technician and teeth guy…[James Conrad]” Camden explains how James was always gracious and considerate in taking his ideas into consideration when designing some of the most amazing sets of teeth for many of his characters on the Buffy and Angel series.

At the conclusion of the Industry Speaks event, a guest asked about the types of characters he preferred to play. Camden exclaimed with a dubious and sinister smile, “Bad guys are SO much more fun to play!”

MUD at IMATS 2014

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The Pasadena Civic Center was surrounded by beauty enthusiasts over the weekend with a line of shoppers waiting to get their hands on the latest beauty tools and to see their favorite make-up artists at this year’s IMATS Los Angeles 2014.  The sold out show featured a slew of beauty product companies, schools and more.  Once you were in the door, the music and sounds of happy shoppers filled the air the entire weekend.

This year’s Pro Night was the most successful Pro Night in the IMATS history, tripling in size of attendees on Friday night, just before the show opened to the public.  The MUD booth featured Disney actress and commercial model Jaida Benjamin, as the MUD artists demonstrated several looks including the Deep Forest trend.

The MUD booth in the special effects hall featured Karl Zundel and Karrie Ann Sillay with a group of 2013 grads working on a tall, full body alien creature.  The character suit and prosthetic appliances were equipped with mechanical hands and a light show that have had the team in preparation mode for over 3 months.  Artists Dalton Kutsch (2007 MUD Grad) and Casey Love (1998 MUD Grad) also demonstrated some amazing sculptures throughout the weekend.

Kevin James Bennett’s presentation in the MUD booth and onstage as IMATS’ keynote speaker included a demonstration of a clean fresh look, a colorful look for the bold and the beautiful, as well as a classy evening look.  Giving out some of his favorite beauty secrets, Bennett wowed the crowd with his simple methods of getting the perfect foundation setting.

Beto Franca was back just in the US from Brazil, just in time for IMATS.  Showing off his amazing airbrush and body painting, the audience stood in awe at the intricate details from start to finish. Meanwhile, in the special effects room, Face Off cast members Cat and Niko created a Labrinth Hoggle using multiple pieces of prosthetic appliances.

The IMATS 2014 events are off to a great start.  Next stop is New York in April at Pier 94.

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