Product Focus: Face Primer

If there’s ever been a best time to look for a good primer, it’s summer. I find that my skin breaks out more in the summer, so making sure I have a good base for my foundations is especially important so that my imperfections stay covered. That’s why I always use MUD’s Face Primer.

Primer is important not only because it sticks to whatever coordinating products you place on top of it, but also because it creates a protective barrier between your skin and your foundation. Our primer is silicone based, which means not only is it compatible with oil and silicone based foundations, but also it’s designed to stay on the surface of the skin to create a smooth, flawless foundation application. To use, just take a very small amount of product (I use about the same amount as a pencil eraser) and smooth it all over the face prior to foundation application.

But primer isn’t just for foundation! On hot summer days, I know I don’t always want to wear a full face of make-up. However, a light layer of primer makes my skin feel soft and silky. I like to make MUD’s primer the last step in my skincare routine to prepare it for make-up no matter how much product I’ll be putting on. Mix it with your foundation or pair it with a little corrector and you’ll have a wonderful, light, everyday summer base.

PRO TIP: Primer can work with powder products too! Mix MUD’s Face Primer with our eye colors, cheek colors, bronzers, or cake eyeliner for more intensity.

When the weather is warm, a lightweight primer is key. Luckily, this primer keeps me covered for a long day out in the sun. MUD’s primer can be purchased at our online store, here.

Product focus : Spark

Spark

7am.

Manhattan.

Dunkin Donuts – the corner of Rector and Greenwich – grabbing breakfast before a busy days work at MUD Studio NY.

“Large coffee and a glazed donut, please.”

I’m waiting for the elevator when I go to grab a bite of my donut, I realize … this is my ideal highlight. It’s dewy, it’s glistening, it’s creamy and so much more.

But seriously, who doesn’t love a good highlight. As someone who’s constantly on the search for the ultimate glow, I was so excited when I got the email that MUD would be releasing our very own highlight shade, Spark! For weeks, I anxiously awaited to arrival of our new cheek color, hoping it would be as radiant, pigmented and silky as the highlighter of my dreams. When it finally came time to reveal Spark, it did not disappoint.

spark_alexis2Above - Alexis wearing Spark as a highlight

Spark is a shimmery golden-beige powder designed to complete your make-up, giving the skin a warm natural glow. While Spark is ideal for highlighting and illuminating it can also be mixed with matte cheek colors to add a touch of shimmer. It’s buildable formula will allow you to create a subtle daytime glow or layer it to achieve a dramatic high shine look.

NEW_Spark_instagram2 Spark swatched

If you’re going for a natural day look apply Spark with a loosely pack fan brush, like MUD Brush #510. If you’re trying to blind with your highlight, use a damp, dense brush like MUD Brush #620 and apply Spark in thin layers.

Pro Tip: For an all over glow that will work just as well for a model on set as it will for bride on her big day, try mixing a dime size amount of our MUD Face Primer with your Spark Cheek Color and apply to high points of the face and body with  fingers or a brush.

CheekColor_Spark

Think of me and my donut the next time you go to highlight with our new cheek color, Spark!

Alexis Chance,  Store Manager at MUD Studio NY

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Glitz & Glam Face Chart by MUD Artist Vanja Djuran

The latest issue of MUD Art includes this beautiful step-by-step illustration for creating a dramatic, glamorous make-up look. Some might say it’s theatrical, others might say it’s perfect for the holidays. Either way, we might all agree that it’s simply stunning.

Eye Colors: Bone, Taupe, Statue, Pavement, Canvas, Onyx | MUD Cake Liner in Black | CFX Wheel 1 Black
Face: Dual Finish Pressed Powder in Light 2 (DFL2)
Brushes: #100 #210 #300 #340 #810
Lips: Sandy Beach

Available on mudshop.com

Remembering Dick Smith

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“Dick Smith died last night…”

The first words I hear from my wife as I roll awake. I lay there trying to digest the words and acknowledge the emotional impact that will befall me, my friends, my students, my peers, my heroes and my industry. I never knew the man well enough to call him a friend. We shared many handshakes, a meal with friends and some kind words. I will forever be remorseful for not taking a moment to ask for a photo commemorating the memory of such an iconic man.

To his closest friends, colleagues and family, I have no words, only a ball of emotion that rolls through my throat, to my eyes then to sink back into the pit of my stomach leaving me feel empty and hollow. I knew what it was like to lose a father, and that’s who Dick was to many people in our industry. The rest of us knew him as a legend, a hero, the “Godfather of Make-up” as he was called, and we knew him as a teacher.

As a teacher, Dick Smith became a symbol of sharing, of guidance, of support, of professionalism, of talent… his work became the very defining marker by which so many make-ups were compared. His contributions and influence on the lives of generations of make-up artists will continue to reshape and define future generations of artists, artists who will never have known or met the man, but will be better artists because of the foundations he laid.

Thank you Dick Smith for being an inspiration to our heroes. Thank you Dick Smith for being my hero. Thank you for your humility and the positive influence you had on so many, many lives.

With sincere admiration and deepest regrets,

Gil Romero
MUD School Director

“What can I say? I loved him. He was a giving, generous, open, kind, amazing human being. He wanted to feed your passion for make-up, he wanted to help you do great work. I remember when I was 13 I asked Dick for his ager stipple formula. I called him on the phone and he was so kind. He went out of his way to make copies of the formula and sent it to me. You can’t find a single person that hasn’t been touched by his kindness. I really can’t put it into words. He’s a legend.”
Chad Washum, MUD Faculty

“Words are so inadequate to relay our thoughts about our dear friend, Dick Smith, and the sympathy and loss we feel on his passing. Not only did the industry lose its foremost innovator and unselfish proponent. But, the world has lost the epitome of kindness, warmth and humility. He has left an indelible mark in our hearts. Our greatest memories are the many times we just listened to his eloquent commentary of his unbelievable life at the many dinners we shared with him. We’ll miss him dearly. So long, Dick. ”
Andre’ & Jenny DiMino (ADM Tronics)

A forefather to his industry and craft. His mark was left on us all. He will forever be missed and never be forgotten. His gifts will surpass his physical life and his talents will surpass us all.
Much Respect Mr Smith
KarrieAnn Sillay, MUD Faculty

Your passion for make-up and sharing your knowledge is your legacy.
Paul Thompson, MUD Director of Education

As a teacher I see Dick Smith’s iconic imagery continue to influence new generations of make-up artists. Though the artist will be missed, the art lives on.
Lisa Leveridge, MUD Faculty

Industry Speaks: Todd McIntosh

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“I could recognize an artist’s stroke; I knew that the same hand that created this make-up, created that make-up.”

Interviewed by Deverill Weekes, Article by Myrna Martinez

Todd McIntosh is a believer—a believer in theatre and movie make-up magic, a believer in an artistic hand that has been touched by a higher power—a believer in knowing every aspect of make-up artistry is the key to no-missed opportunities. When the key that unlocked your life’s calling is found in classics like Dark Shadows, or the theatrical magic of Peter Pan, and—Spock’s ears?—you know you’ve been called to be an artist.

At eight years old, Todd began exploring what he could do with an eyeliner pencil, drawing lines on his face and creating characters with available materials. A neighbor who surely saw something amazing in this young boy, gifted him with a book on how to create stage make-up. By 12 years old, he worked in theatre; by 15 he was molding; by 16 he was teaching his high-school classmates make-up techniques and by 18 he was employed by a Studio.

This young, talented artist was on his way to creating multitudes of characters in his lifetime. Determined to master his craft, he learned all aspects of make-up, from beauty to character and Make-up FX.

“Every skill you are without is every job you go without,” is Todd’s ambitious philosophy. But, only a special kind of passion for what he does can cause him to be so driven. “I could recognize an artist’s stroke; I knew that the same hand that created this make-up, created that make-up.” With such keen focus on the artistry, Deverill asked if there was anyone who contributed to his fire—and like many artists before him, he answered, “Dick Smith.”

“Dick Smith was my first, well, I don’t have the words for it. He has this artistic ability that transcends the average—he has a hand that’s been touched by God.” Todd continues, “I went to a museum with Dick and he had me looking into paintings. I saw colors in skin I had never seen before—greens and blues—and I learned first-hand from Dick Smith.”

Today, Todd is inspired by make-ups on shows like Supernatural, Salem and American Horror Story. He remembers a certain aging make-up in a final shot of AHS that he thought was absolutely brilliant.

Now, our students’ eyes are on you, Mr. McIntosh. We are so very honored that you visited MUD and shared your personal stories of growth and inspired us with your experience.

MUD LA Students with Todd McIntosh, Daveid DeLeon and Deverill Weekes

About Todd / http://www.mcintoshmakeup.com/

Todd McIntosh is known for his work on Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) Emmy Winner, Memoirs of a Geisha (2005) Pushing Daisies (2009) (Emmy Winner)

NY Campus Reaches New Heights

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The New York MUD campus is on its way to the top-or at least to the 15th floor.  The school’s new home address at 65 Broadway sits within the original American Express Building.

Recently securing the renovated space about a mile and a half from the current site, the new school space will allow accommodations for future growth including 2 additional classrooms and a host of amenities.  The spacious special effects classroom includes about 954 square feet of workspace for up to 26 students.  The entire 15th floor will incase the school’s learning space with separate lounges for students and teachers and a beautiful view of the city for inspiration.    In addition to the expansion, students will enjoy the upgraded technology enhancements and for easy access, the campus store will be conveniently located within the center of the campus.

Renovations are underway and while the move will officially take place around early summer, classes will continue to resume as scheduled.

http://www.mud.edu

 

The Man Behind IMATS and Make-up Artist Magazine: Michael Key

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With IMATS Los Angeles just around the corner, the buzz surrounding this huge industry event is deafening. To give you an idea of how big, let’s just say 10K tickets were sold and over 200 vendors will be present. The show offers excellent make-up educations classes taught by the industry’s best, live on-stage presentations, special make-up effects demonstrations, show-only offers by the best make-up brands, Battle of the Brushes student competition and more!

How did something that was just a “trial” become so popular? Last night, when Deverill Weekes interviewed Michael Key, make-up artist and the man behind IMATS and Make-up Artist Magazine, we got a simple answer: there was a need for it.

Michael is a musician who was caught in a twist of fate. When asked what started his career in make-up, he replied, “music was my first love, but it wasn’t taking. I’ve always loved movies, and I came across ‘Cinefex’ a magazine that covers behind the scenes movie make-up. It had a step-by-step on how to sculpt, and I thought, `I could do that’. So, I went to a hobby store, purchased plaster and clay and did everything wrong.” It turns out, that after 7 weeks, he successfully sculpted a head. He and his friends used it as a prop to scare people. Then, he got his friends to pitch in to purchase foam latex, so they too could have their own props. Project after project Michael was able to make somewhat of a portfolio, although, he credits his “gift of gab” for getting him his first make-up effects studio job.

Michael’s make-up career includes five Emmy Award nominations, and two wins for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. His make-up credits include Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Planet of the Apes, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Charmed, Batman and Robin and more. (IMDb: Michael Key)

Deverill asked, “Who were your heroes and mentors?” With no hesitation, Michael names Michael Westmore, Jack Dawn, Christopher Tucker, Jack Pierce, Rick Baker, and Dick Smith. He credits Michael Westmore for teaching him lessons you don’t learn in a text book, like how to work with a producer and how to present yourself as a class act. He is grateful for Dick Smith for agreeing to be a part of the first IMATS stating that because of Mr. Smith, it was a success.

During Michael Key’s early career, he noticed that there weren’t enough resources for aspiring artists. Everything he learned was from trial and error and knowledge shared by his peers and mentors. Because this knowledge was so valuable, he was inspired to get it in writing and thus Make-up Artist Magazine was born. He admits that he’s shocked it went beyond the first three issues, but today we celebrate 106 issues of a great publication.

The interview concluded with a raffle for two sets of sold-out IMATS tickets.

Thank you Michael Key for sharing your story with us, and thank you fate for putting Cinefex in his hands!

The wait is over. Face Off Season 6 is here.

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Last night, Make-up Designory hosted a Face Off viewing party to celebrate MUD Alumni Bethany Serpico, Cat Paschen and Niko Gonzalez’s debut on the show. The party was held at Gordon-Biersch in  Burbank, CA. Guests included MUD’s CEO Tate Holland, Director of Education Paul Thompson, MUD LA’s school Director Gil Romero, VP Karl Zundel along with Niko, Cat, school instructors, current students, friends and family. All were there to show their support for our grads, the make-up artist community and fellow cast members.

The room was filled with anticipation, but while the beginning credits began to roll, the room exploded with cheers and applause. Everyone watched as the contestants were met with their first foundation challenge. Models appeared on stage in fanciful wigs and contestants were challenged to create a character make-up in TWO HOURS that expressed who they were as artists. The winners would receive immunity from elimination this week. The second challenge was to create the Beast based on the tale “Beauty and the Beast. “ While everyone worked in teams, there were some teams that showed individuals who were stronger than others.

We’re happy to report that our grads survived the first challenges of the season! Watch the first episode here.

Check out Entertainment Weekly’s Interview with Face Off Judge Ve Neill to find out what she’s specifically looking for when she judges, her favorite challenges and her advice to aspiring Face Off contestants.

Keep up with #teamMUD and check out photos, comments and updates on Twitter @mudschools Facebook @mudschools and Instagram @makeupdesignory

Make-up Designory’s Open House / Los Angeles

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Make-Up Designory’s Open House was a huge success! The event was held from 1p – 6p at the Burbank campus, and was packed with exciting proceedings from the time doors opened until the last make-up brush was put away for class the next morning.

The afternoon began with tours of the school while class was still in session. Prospective students witnessed the process of special effects, beauty, and airbrush make-up.

Soon after, special guest Kazuhiro Tsuji was presented with an Award of Recognition for his distinguished service as a world-renowned make-up artist by assemblyman Mike Gatto of the 43rd District. Make-up Designory would like to give our special thanks to Kazu for allowing us to display his latest work, Lincoln, in our studio for our Open House.

Once the award ceremony concluded, our student competition began. Nine students competed for their chance to represent Make-up Designory at the upcoming Make-up Show Los Angeles “Wonder Games 2013.” The competition theme was “Fantasy Beauty / Grimm’s Fairy Tales.” Participants were given two hours to complete their project, and not a minute was wasted.

While the students worked feverishly, guests continued to mingle, and enjoyed local Portos Cuban pastries, fresh fruit, and refreshments.  The halls were packed with special guests Byrd HollandTommy Cole (Local 706), Tate Holland, Karl Zundel, Paul Thompson and – as previously mentioned – Kazu and Mike Gatto, along with excited future MUA’s.

After 20 minutes of deliberation, the results were in.  The winner of this year’s Open House student competition is Vanessa Delgado and her creation, “Red Riding Hood” from “The Little Red Cap.” Second place went to Audrey Ramos and her rendition of “The Snow Queen” from “Hans Christian Anderson.” Congratulations to all of the participants! You were all GREAT.

If you’d like to attend our next open house, or are interested in a personal tour of Make-up Designory,  contact us. We’d be more than happy to have you as our guest.

To view more photos of the event, please visit our Flickr Open House Album.