MUD Celebrates Our Emmy Nominated and Winning Grads

Everyone knows MUD grads are some of the most talented and professional artists in Hollywood, but the Emmy’s this year make us all particularly proud. MUD would like to officially congratulate our MUD Graduates Emma Faulkes and Natalie Driscoll on their Emmy wins!  Congratulations as well to our MUD Graduate nominees Melissa Buell, Kristina Frisch, Nicole Faulkner, Jen Fregozo, Gina Ghiglieri Carleigh Herbert and Hugo Villasenor.

In celebration, we will be posting make-up artist spotlights on each of our nominated alumni every weekday until the Emmy awards show. Stay tuned for success stories and advice from the following grads:  

2018 Emmy Winners
Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Limited Series, Movie or Special
Emma Faulkes, Special Makeup Effects Artist: Game of Thrones • The Dragon and the Wolf
 
Outstanding Hairstyling for a Limited Series or Movie

Natalie Driscoll, Key Hairstylist: The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime 

2018 Emmy Nominees
Outstanding Makeup for a Single-Camera Series (Non-Prosthetic)
Melissa Buell, Makeup Artist & Kristina Frisch, Makeup Artist: GLOW • Money’s in the Chase
 
Outstanding Makeup for a Multi-Camera Series or Special (Non-Prosthetic)
Nicole Faulkner, Makeup Artist & Jen Fregozo, Makeup Artist: RuPaul’s Drag Race • 10s Across the Board
Gina Ghiglieri, Makeup Artist: The Voice • Live Finale, Part 1
 
Outstanding Makeup for a Limited Series or Movie (NonProsthetic)
Carleigh Herbert, Makeup Artist: American Horror Story • Cult
Melissa Buell, Makeup Artist: The Last Tycoon • Oscar, Oscar, Oscar
 
Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Limited Series, Movie or Special
Carleigh Herbert, Makeup Artist: American Horror Story • Cult
Hugo Villasenor, Special Makeup Effects Artist: Star Trek: Discovery • Will You Take My Hand?
Phone: 323-702-1136 number updated, left message 8/14/18
 
Congratulations, MUD graduates!

MUD Celebrates Our 20th Anniversary with Paul Thompson

 

Starting his make-up career in 1987, Paul Thompson is MUD’s Director of Education and organizational leader behind the MUD Schools. Unlike our students, Thompson didn’t go to a traditional make-up school, instead he taught himself and took scattered classes under the guidance of an instructor at his community college. In the beginning he took jobs as a makeup assistant, learning from his experiences. As his career progressed he primarily worked in television and commercials, and ultimately opened his own FX shop. While working as a makeup artist, Thompson was also teaching extension courses at UCLA and doing master classes for multiple other cosmetic brands. Having fallen in love with the learning process itself, he went on to get a teaching credential and started teaching for MUD. Additionally, he authored the first edition of MUD’s character textbook Character Make-Up and co-wrote the second edition with Gil Romero.

Even with a firm belief in the power of education, Paul manages to keep things light and fun. whether he’s stealing his coworkers’ candy or face swapping photos of him and his wife, Francine, he keeps the MUD offices running with his goofy shenanigans. With his booming voice and high energy, Paul Thompson is the joyful lead behind the MUD education.

Q: What makes MUD different from our competitors?

A: From the beginning we fundamentally believe that the most important person in our organization is the student. We want them to have an exceptional experience at MUD learning makeup. To feel good about their choice of coming to MUD, and once they got in a class, we wanted to make it so meaningful and so outcome-based that they walked away getting everything they needed to start their career. In the beginning we really felt that we could make a makeup school that was better than anything that came before us. The other thing that continues to make us different is all the people that work here–all the different people that give voice to the education, whether it be the teachers, management, or the outside industry talking to us and working with us. It’s not a person, per se. It’s not Joe Shmoe’s make-up school, it is Make-Up Designory. So, it’s not based around me or Tate or any other single individual. It’s all about a company that does something of real value.

Q: Who is the MUD student?

A: I see students as so many different individuals. Our students are people that are just getting out of high school looking to start their career, but they can also be somebody that’s changing careers. I’m a make-up artist, and I’ve been a makeup artist my whole life. I see our student as me–as what I wanted and what I needed when I started. I learned as I went, and because of that I feel like I really relate to the students. I know what their needs are and, ultimately, what their dreams are regarding them wanting to be professional makeup artists. MUD is that company that really helps students to live those dreams.

Q: In the last 20 years, how have the MUD schools changed?

A: Originally, we said we were just going to do one school. But, we wanted to make the best school possible–one that had high-end, high quality education. I felt that we were doing a service that most schools couldn’t match because they just did not have the passion that we were pouring into it. Each one of the owners of the company were in the classrooms, doing everything we could to make the school the best it could be. The big switch came when we opened our NY campus and we expanded into Studios and Partner schools. Instead of just one campus, there are now 92 campuses offering some form of MUD education.

Q: Did you envision a cosmetic line back in 1997?

A: No, not so much. I know Tate initially was kind of like “oh maybe we should do products” but we didn’t have the wear-with-all to do that. It grew from Francine, really. She was the guru in product development and the rest of us would give her our opinions. She knew manufacturing and how to acquire things, she was the one who really got us started.

Q: Did you ever think MUD would reach the size it has now?

A: It’s hard to look back and go “oh, yeah, I knew we would be huge,” but I really didn’t. I knew we would be the size of some of the schools here in Los Angeles and have two or three classrooms, maybe four, tops. But, we grew to five classrooms and had extra teachers and people in the first year! I thought that all we would have is this cool little business and we would be set–and what I mean by “set” is that we would have jobs, we would do what we loved, we would be happy, and we would be able to make a good living. It’s crazy where it’s gone.

Q: Is there a most memorable moment from the last 20 years? Or maybe a funniest moment?

A: There’s a whole slew of funny events and things that have happened over the years. Time has absolutely flown by. My youngest daughter was born right after we started MUD, and seeing her in college now and knowing that’s how long the company has been around is cool, you know?

Q: Where do you see MUD in the next 20 years?

A: I think we’re going to see a lot more growth, on the education side we will be adding more campuses. For us, we are investing in the US and helping students live that dream of working as a makeup artist. It’s interesting how other cosmetic companies are moving to sell in China, even though to sell in China you have to test on animals. Companies are looking to China for that big untapped market. I really think the sky is the limit for the cosmetics side of things, however we will never test on animals.

Q: Is there anything else you want to include?

A: I love my job! We try very hard to help students find this level of happiness, to help them live their dreams. For me, I am so happy with the choices that I’ve made in my life and the great bunch of people that I work with. I couldn’t be luckier.

MUD Celebrates Our 20th Anniversary with Stephen McCallum

Who is Stephen McCallum? A true jack-of-all-trades, Stephen has filled just about every position we have at MUD. In the beginning, McCallum and CEO Tate Holland did all the paperwork for the school side-by-side, including admissions and contracts. His greatest accomplishment at MUD is perhaps applying for the school’s accreditation–even in the face of a full software crash three days before the site team visited MUD’s Los Angeles location. In his own words, “if there’s something to be done around here I’ve done it–except that guy’s job,” pointing to Holland’s office, “and I don’t want it.”

Now, McCallum jokingly calls himself “the most overpaid secretary in the world,” but that’s not really accurate. McCallum always stays tied to Operations and management here at MUD. But his most important task of all? Keeping our office running with his mischievous sense of humor and opportune life advice. Full of laughs and stories, Stephen McCallum is the behind-the-scenes expert on all things MUD.

Q: How has the MUD team changed over the years?

A: In size and scope, we have changed enormously, from a small three-room school to an international corporation with two primary campuses, schools Europe, Latin America, and Africa, and many other educational partnerships around the world. However, in our essence and mission, MUD has changed very little in 20 years. We started as a group of friends, and very high goals…now, our goals remain ambitious and our friends have grown.

Q: Looking back, what do you think is the biggest challenge MUD has overcome?

A: The biggest challenges MUD had was being accepted as a real school, then as a real cosmetics line. However, with our true work ethic and a line of outstanding products, we quickly earned the respect of our students, our grads, and our professional friends in the industry. And, for twenty years, we have maintained that ethic and that respect.

Q: How did you envision the future of MUD back in 1997?

A:  The guys were good at their jobs, but risked their homes, their families, and their careers. I was a wandering leftover from the 60’s, not afraid to fail. But, they put their livelihood in my hands, asking me to manage the paperwork that is demanded in the business world. With the help and support from Crystal Wright, editor of “The Make-up and Hairstylist Guide,” Maurice Stein of Cinema Secret, Dana Nye of Ben Nye Cosmetics, and Wolfram Langer of Kryolan, we built a school ready to represent the film and television industry. And, the support of the Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education set standards worthy of being lived up to, and have supported the school since the very beginning.

Q: What’s your most memorable moment from the last 20 years? Your funniest moment?

A: The most memorable moment was March 20, 2001, when the California State Senate made it “Make-Up Designory” Day, with State Senator John Scott presenting us with an official Resolution. The ceremony was nerve-aching. There were lots of people touring our brand-new facilities in Burbank, only two years after our start.

My most memorable moment was the original application and process for our Accreditation through ACCSCT (now, just ACCSC). It required five weeks of effort, 69 pounds of paperwork, and having our computer software completely crash two days before the on-site visit. We received the Commission’s approval on our first attempt.

There have been plenty of funny moments. However, the two best were:

  1. a) In 1998, our first year, we were on Riverside Drive in Toluca Lake. Right across the street was Trader Joe’s. After Paul completed a very descriptive injury demonstration, the student (not realizing the effect) walked across the street to get her lunch, sending the store into complete chaos. The staff even called 9-1-1 thinking she was in shock! We were asked to refrain from our students doing that again.
  2. b) In 2005, we had just opened our New York campus. Then, during the character class, students were so excited by the “characters” they were, they wore their makeups home, to show their families, on the subway. This, of course, created a whole new series of panics, resulting in NYPD sending us a letter to instruct our students they could not wear their makeups on the subway!

 

MUD Open House Saturday July 14th

Next Saturday, July 14th, we will be having our annual open house at MUD’s Burbank Location. The event will be from 10:00am to 1:00pm. Prospective students, parents, grads, family, and friends are all encouraged to attend!

We are all familiar with the magic of MUD, but not everybody has had the opportunity to explore our school and see all that we have to offer. At our open house, guests will have the opportunity to visit the campus and cosmetic store, check out our course catalogue, and meet with administrative staff and instructors. Best of all, guests can also see demos by talented artists ranging from beauty to special effects.

We ask that students RSVP by contacting us at 818.729.9420 or responding to the Eventbrite. However, all are welcome! Our next New York open house will be August 24th.

Product Focus: Face Primer

If there’s ever been a best time to look for a good primer, it’s summer. I find that my skin breaks out more in the summer, so making sure I have a good base for my foundations is especially important so that my imperfections stay covered. That’s why I always use MUD’s Face Primer.

Primer is important not only because it sticks to whatever coordinating products you place on top of it, but also because it creates a protective barrier between your skin and your foundation. Our primer is silicone based, which means not only is it compatible with oil and silicone based foundations, but also it’s designed to stay on the surface of the skin to create a smooth, flawless foundation application. To use, just take a very small amount of product (I use about the same amount as a pencil eraser) and smooth it all over the face prior to foundation application.

But primer isn’t just for foundation! On hot summer days, I know I don’t always want to wear a full face of make-up. However, a light layer of primer makes my skin feel soft and silky. I like to make MUD’s primer the last step in my skincare routine to prepare it for make-up no matter how much product I’ll be putting on. Mix it with your foundation or pair it with a little corrector and you’ll have a wonderful, light, everyday summer base.

PRO TIP: Primer can work with powder products too! Mix MUD’s Face Primer with our eye colors, cheek colors, bronzers, or cake eyeliner for more intensity.

When the weather is warm, a lightweight primer is key. Luckily, this primer keeps me covered for a long day out in the sun. MUD’s primer can be purchased at our online store, here.

Product Focus: Idol Lipstick

 

Do you turn to a bright red lipstick every time you want a pop of color? Or have you never ventured outside of peaches and nudes? Either way, it might be time to go outside of your comfort zone and pick up a vibrant, purple lip color. Lucky for you, we’ve got you covered with my favorite MUD lipstick, Idol.

Arriving in a rich, magenta-purple shade, Idol stands alone as a strong statement lip that’s flattering on a multitude of skin tones from light to dark. It’s a twist on a deep, vampy lip shade that’s a little bit more purple, but not so bright that it isn’t wearable from day-to-day. We recommend lining the lip with one of our MUD lip pencils before applying with our #310 lip brush for a precise, bold look.

However, don’t think you’re limited to just one look with this color! After strutting my stuff with a rainbow make-up look at pride, I was able to make the look more mature for a family dinner that evening by pairing Idol with a maroon lip liner like our Mahogany or Mauve shade around the edges. Just line the lips and blend in until about halfway with the maroon shade and touch up with Idol in the center for a sultry ombre lip look.

If wearing a lot of product on the lip isn’t your thing, Idol makes for a lovely lip stain as well! Whether you’re going to the beach or trying to tone down your lip shade on your way to the gym like I did, just blot the lipstick evenly for a healthy-looking berry stain.

Versatile and bold, Idol has quickly become a mainstay in my primary make-up bag. It can be worn for a formal occasion, a festival, or even when you want to spice up your everyday make-up. I get compliments whenever I wear it, and I’m sure you will too. 

Idol lipstick can be purchased here.

How to Create a Flawless Face and Bumping it up with a Smoky Eye

Make-up Designory (MUD) has partnered with the Miss Universe Organization as this year’s Official Cosmetics Sponsor of 2014 MISS USA® and 2014 MISS TEEN USA® competitions. Since our MUD Alumni will take part in beautifying the contestants for the competition, we thought we’d show you how to create the beautiful looks seen on stage. In this video playlist, MUD’s Lead Make-up Artist shows you how to create a flawless face make-up and also, how to create a beautiful smoky eye.

We hope you enjoy the videos as much as we enjoyed producing them for you!

#MUDbeauty
mudshop.com // mud.edu

 

MUD and Beauty Launchpad Magazine

Beauty Launchpad December 2013

MUD Los Angeles photographer Derek Althen had the opportunity to work with Beauty Launchpad Magazine and recruited two recent MUD grads Lisa Ribar and Natalie Stow to assist Linda Flowers (Hair Dept.Head/ The Hunger Games: Catching Fire) and Marie DelPrete (Make-up artist/ The Hunger Games) for the shoot. Derek also recruited MUD grad Denise “Dee” Zamora to assist with photo shoot production.

The magazine gave credit to Make-up Designory for providing the studio space as well as credit to the MUD grads for assisting Make-up and Hair.

Other Artist involved:
Michelle Bouse: Make-up specialist/ Lips, eye lash & brows.
Guy Tang: Hair for male model. http://www.beautylaunchpad.com/video-tutorial-hunger-games-inspired-winter-lavender-hair-color

Link to Beauty Launch Magazine digital version.
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/creativeage/launchpad_201312/#/60
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/creativeage/launchpad_201312/#/52

Beautiful work everyone!

Make-up Designory’s Open House / Los Angeles

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Make-Up Designory’s Open House was a huge success! The event was held from 1p – 6p at the Burbank campus, and was packed with exciting proceedings from the time doors opened until the last make-up brush was put away for class the next morning.

The afternoon began with tours of the school while class was still in session. Prospective students witnessed the process of special effects, beauty, and airbrush make-up.

Soon after, special guest Kazuhiro Tsuji was presented with an Award of Recognition for his distinguished service as a world-renowned make-up artist by assemblyman Mike Gatto of the 43rd District. Make-up Designory would like to give our special thanks to Kazu for allowing us to display his latest work, Lincoln, in our studio for our Open House.

Once the award ceremony concluded, our student competition began. Nine students competed for their chance to represent Make-up Designory at the upcoming Make-up Show Los Angeles “Wonder Games 2013.” The competition theme was “Fantasy Beauty / Grimm’s Fairy Tales.” Participants were given two hours to complete their project, and not a minute was wasted.

While the students worked feverishly, guests continued to mingle, and enjoyed local Portos Cuban pastries, fresh fruit, and refreshments.  The halls were packed with special guests Byrd HollandTommy Cole (Local 706), Tate Holland, Karl Zundel, Paul Thompson and – as previously mentioned – Kazu and Mike Gatto, along with excited future MUA’s.

After 20 minutes of deliberation, the results were in.  The winner of this year’s Open House student competition is Vanessa Delgado and her creation, “Red Riding Hood” from “The Little Red Cap.” Second place went to Audrey Ramos and her rendition of “The Snow Queen” from “Hans Christian Anderson.” Congratulations to all of the participants! You were all GREAT.

If you’d like to attend our next open house, or are interested in a personal tour of Make-up Designory,  contact us. We’d be more than happy to have you as our guest.

To view more photos of the event, please visit our Flickr Open House Album.

MAKE-UP TUTORIAL: VINTAGE 1930’S GLAMOUR

Image
Full application of a vintage 1930’s make-up

The make-up trends of the 1930’s were dramatic, feminine, and classic. In this tutorial we are going to create an iconic 1930’s look using make-up techniques that will transport us back in time.

Get This Look:

Face: Prep the face before applying Face Primer using a Professional Make-up Sponge. The base color best suited for this look is an ivory tone that may be 1-2 shades lighter than the natural skin. Apply MUD’s Cream Foundation all over the face with the #940 Foundation Brush, extending down past the jaw line and into the hair line.

Brows: In the 1930’s women had very sculpted and extended brows. In order to achieve this look we will need to block out the brows using a combination of Red Corrector 1 and Blue Corrector 1. This can be done before or after the foundation is applied. After the brows are blocked in, set brows and face with Loose Powder in Shell using #800 Crease Brush. Start by setting under and around the eyes. Then, switch to the #510 Duster Brush for the rest of the face and neck. Now it’s time color and shape the brows using highlight and shadow. Start out by filling in the brows with a combination of Onyx Eye Color and Espresso Eye Color and the #210 Angle Liner Brush. Remember to exaggerate and extend the brow outward.

Eyes: Moving on to eyes, start by highlight the brow bone using the #330 Shadow Fluff Brush and the Honeysuckle Eye Color, place it directly under the brow and pull down toward the crease. To create a subtle crease, use a combination of Taupe Eye Color and Canyon Eye Color on the #330 Shadow Fluff Brush. Blend it out with the #800 Crease Brush and just a touch of Berrywood Eye Color to warm it up. Go back to the Honeysuckle Eye Color with the #330 Shadow Fluff Brush and apply just a small amount to the inner corner of the lid. Along the lower lash line, drag the #210 Angle Liner Brush and just a touch of the Onyx along the bottom there for a lovely drop shadow effect.

Lashes: For this classic 1930’s look use strip lashes for a authentic vintage feel. Saturate the strips with Duo lash adhesive and wait about a minute for the adhesive to get tacky. Then you are ready to apply. Using Black Cake Eyeliner and the #100 Round Liner Brush you are able to camouflage the strip and create a more natural feel by lining the eye with a soft winged out tip at the outer corner. To complete the eyes it’s time for a generous coat of Black Volumizing Mascara which is applied with our #500 Mascara Brush.

Cheeks: Rose Petal Cheek Color is perfect for this time period, as it wasn’t until the mid to late 1930’s when we saw more plum and raspberry tones. Apply to the apples of the cheeks using the #710 Powder Brush.

Lips: Line the upper and lower lip lines with the Natural Lip Pencil. When doing this, slightly over accentuate the line creating a larger upper lip. Fill in the lips using a combination of both Mai Tai Sheer Lipstick and Blackberry Satin Lipstick along with the #310 Lip Brush.