Chronicles of a Traveling Make-up Artist for MUD: This Stop, London

So once again I’m ready to board a long flight. After my 16 hour flight to Dubai this 11 hour flight seems like nothing at all. Once again after a lot of movies and trying to sleep through the bumpy ride we finally arrive in London. This time I am also traveling with a fellow make-up artist Chad Washam who is also visiting London for the first time. As we are driving (on the wrong side of the road!) to our hotel the cute villages and quaint buildings are absolutely adorable. There is a blend between the older style buildings as well as some newer modern styled skyscrapers and best of all, pubs everywhere you turn.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We only had one free morning to explore London before we had to get ready for the tradeshow, so we decided to take a double decker tour bus and ride through all of the sites. We had to take the train to the first bus stop and in the station was this amazing sculpture. Also, as we walk the streets there are these adorable little back streets that are filled with cute little shops and pubs.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once we finally get on the bus we pass by some of the amazing sites to see. St. Paul’s Cathedral, Tower Bridge, London Eye, Big Ben and so much more. We didn’t have much time so we weren’t able to get off the bus and explore more the way we would have liked.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

One stop we did make sure to jump off and explore was Buckingham Palace. We had no idea that we had timed our stop perfectly. As soon as we walked up to the palace the changing of the guards was beginning. The crowd was so packed it was impossible for us to see much of anything at all.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Since we couldn’t see much of anything we decided to explore the beautiful park across the street and what a gorgeous site it was. The scenery was like something out of a fairy tale, including two of the biggest swans I had ever seen in my life!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

After we saw all that we could see we headed back to the bus to make sure we got to the venue on time to set up our booth for the next day. As we headed back to the bus and were ready to cross the street a police officer asked us to stop for a moment as the guards were heading right past us. Front row view!! We couldn’t have timed it better if we had tried 

The next day we were off to the Business Design Centre for the UMA expo!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The first day Chad worked on our model creating a chemical spill victim and then an alien makeup as well. Watching Chad work and some of his techniques was an amazing experience for myself and the attendees of the expo as well.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The second day Chad re-creates some looks that he had shown at Monsterpalooza. The female Thanos and the Japanese Uni character as well.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Even though this trip was short it was so amazing to meet new friends and continue to work with this amazing MUD family!

NY Fashion Week 2015

Fashion-Week-Spring-2015_FIT1

Make-up Designory joined forces with the Fashion Design students from the Art Institute of New York City for another successful fashion show last night. Doors opened to the public at 8pm but we were backstage to give Twitter followers the inside scoop at 7pm with MUD’s first ever live tweet session! First, we caught up with the Key Makeup Artist Jackie Caruso who explained her vision for the makeup concept. “Being that this was a Mercedes-Benz Spring/Summer fashion show, I wanted the makeup to be fresh and clean with a pop of color”. Jackie used MUD’s Deco eye shadow in teal blue and MUD 107 Lashes which were generously donated by MUD Cosmetics in order to achieve the desired look.

Backstage was hectic to say the least as the makeup artist scrambled to apply the makeup,while working cohesively with the hair and nail teams to prepare the models. Soon it was time for final looks. Suddenly, Jackie explained to everyone that the models were looking “a bit too shiny” so she advised her team to quickly apply the MUD Matte powder to contain the gleam.

The makeup team featured members of MUD Studio New York, MUD Alumni, and even current MUD students!  We would like to Recognize a particular MUD Alumna for her participation in this event. Nicole Elle Rogers is a 2012 graduate of MUD’s Fashion program and has been involved in the make-up and fashion industry for years. She’s already a seasoned pro at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week as last night was her 4th season!  Stay tuned for a full article and interview with this amazing MUD-trained Makeup Artist!

Fashion Week Spring 2015_FIT 2

This Fashion Week was especially dear to us as well as other fashion enthusiasts because it is the last year the shows will be sponsored by Mercedes-Benz. Mercedes-Benz announced that after five years it will no longer be affiliated with NY Fashion Week. We are eager to see where next season’s Fashion Week will be held!

We would like to congratulate our MUD Makeup artists on an incredible show and another job well done!


Article written by Stacia McCarthy
MUD New York

2015 Make-up Artists and Hairstylists Guild Award Nominees Announced

Congratulations to all of the 2015 Make-up Artists and Hairstylists Guild Award nominees!

We would like to recognize and congratulate MUD alumna Essie Cha on her nomination for Best Contemporary Make-up in Television Media Series from AMC’s  The Walking Dead, MUD alumna Sarah B. Wolfe on her nomination for Best Make-up in Theatrical Productions (Live Stage) for Kinky Boots and finally, congratulations to MUD Faculty Member Vanessa Dionne for her nomination for Best Make-up and Best Hair Stylist in Theatrical Productions (Live Stage) for Così fan tutte.

the-walking-dead-s4b-key-artinterior-logoCosì fan tutte

Industry Speaks: Cloutier Remix

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Madeline Leonard, Director and Owner of the prominent agency Cloutier Remix, along with her team Libby Anderson and Marissa Alfe,visited Make-up designory Burbank to give students and alumni some insight on what it takes to get representation. The advice they gave was hearty and straight forward. “Show only your best work. Your portfolio is only as strong as your weakest image,” stated Madeline Leonard. Marissa, a new comer to the agency is focused on moving forward in the digital direction. She emphasized the importance of making sure your Online presence represents you as a professional artist and reflects your work and experiences in the best light, especially if you’re seeking work as a Brand Ambassador. “Brands want to protect their image and want someone that conducts themselves in a way that aligns with their brand.”

During the group discussion, the panel was asked to describe what it meant to have an agent. “We do whatever it takes for the artist to be seen in the best possible way, that they get credited for their work, and that their image is protected as a brand—artists are their own brand. Nothing we do for our artists is too big a task, or too small,” responded Libby, while adding, “my goal is to make my client’s goals happen.”

Upon concluding the group discussion, the panel graciously agreed to review MUD Alumni Magali Perets’s website magalirachel.com and give her pointers on how to make it presentation-ready. “Portfolios these days are all online. It’s rare that a portfolio is delivered as a hard cover. Your site must state exactly what you do, it must be easy to navigate and again, show only your best work!”

We would like to thank Madeline and her team again for taking the time to share their valuable insight with our students. We hope they visit us again soon!

About Cloutier Remix | http://cloutierremix.com/

Cloutier Agency­—Los Angeles’ premiere hair, makeup and styling agency—is reborn as Cloutier Remix.
Always respectful of its remarkable legacy of longevity in relationships with artists and clients, Cloutier Remix is taking on the future.

Says Madeline Leonard, heartbeat of the agency for the last 23 years and now owner, “Our new name update reflects our developing direction. In addition to continuing to represent prestigious, innovative beauty and fashion talent, we’re also forging new alliances worldwide and establishing a stronger presence in New York.”

This global positioning is the next logical step for the agency, given that the clients, companies and media who generate beauty and fashion imagery are worldwide players. Furthermore, Cloutier Remix artists are at home on the world stage. At any given time, in fact, Cloutier Remix is sending talent to work on location on five continents.
With a stellar roster and flawless integrity in place, Cloutier Remix will continue to build real alliances with clients and artists. And that’s a beautiful thing.

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/cloutierremix | Instagram: http://instagram.com/cloutierremix

Industry Speaks: Make-up Artist Jordu Schell

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Contributor: Svenya Nimmons

They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, but in the case of Jordu Schell, what frightens you, makes you create an imagination of your own.  At a young age, he gasped at an image of someone being chased in a movie and his mother quickly shut the television off.  Fearful and curious, the artist-to-be was then left to imagine what the creature looked like.

His curiosity continued as he began experimenting with masks during his youth, landing him at a tradeshow in Chicago where he was the first boutique mask maker showcasing his works.  The rest is history.

With such credits as Alien Resurrection, Men in Black, Avatar and Edward Scissorhands, this industry vet has 30 years of experience in painting, sculpting and designing. You can find him at work in his studio in Chatsworth, CA.  His lovely and talented assistant Emily Deroski helps with sculpting and her attitude of just showing up to do whatever is needed for the day is admirable.  Plus, she’s great with auto mechanics which adds to her cool factor.

So what makes an awesome character?  According to Schell, a well-crafted piece with an expansive imagination of form really brings it home. His advice as an artist looking to be taken seriously in the industry is quite simple: Be prepared for whatever opportunity comes your way with a website, business cards and a knack for networking that shows your genuine interest in what you do. “You’re not entitled to anything and the world owes you nothing,”- great advice from the guy from Philly that learned to love horror films in a way that has shaped his career.

As always, we are immensely grateful to Jordu and all of our  guests who give their time, knowledge and expertise to help our students through this diverse industry!

Industry Speaks: Don Lanning

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“If you feel you are an artist, you owe it to yourself to be an artist.” Don Lanning

Don Lanning was born in Van Nuys, California in the heart of Hollywood’s creature effects community. With early heroes Dick Smith, John Chambers, Stan Winston, Rick Baker and Rob Bottin as guides, Don started sculpting creatures at 10 years old. Don is known for his consistent ability to deliver the highest quality work at lightning speed on projects from conservative realism to the archetypes of horror, fantasy, and science fiction.

As our Industry Speaks guest last night, Don took us through his career—a career that got started 10 years after his initial opportunity. He told the story of meeting Dick Smith at age 17. Mr. Smith being a helpful mentor to many artists, was also there for Don, giving him the phone numbers to people who might help him get his start in the industry that held his heart and passion. But, there was something, or someone else who held Don’s heart and passion—a girl—and Don chose a career in real estate, perhaps assuming a steadier path. After 10 years, Don took a good look at himself and didn’t recognize the person he saw. He described it as feeling like he was in someone else’s clothing, living someone else’s life.

Shortly thereafter, he had the opportunity to sculpt for a commercial. It was during that process wherein he acknowledged his calling. He said, “I was found.”

Don’s story was the premise for the rest of the evening’s conversation as he encouraged MUD students to stick to their dreams. “If you feel you are an artist, you owe it to yourself to be an artist…you are the most beautiful when you are creating…art is the only thing worth doing.”  While Don shared his impressive portfolio, the true inspiration may have been in the pep talk he gave for living the life you want.

Don has recently received high praise entering the world of fine art with his modern take on pop icons Batman & The Joker and his elaborate reimagining of The Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, and Tinman from “OZ.” His work is featured in more than 50 motion pictures and he continues to live out his passion, recently opening up a shop in Van Nuys, California.

Don’t miss out on these valuable opportunities extended to you to meet and speak with industry pros at our weekly Industry Speaks events. Our monthlyevent calendar can be found on our facebook page: facebook.com/mudschools

Don Lanning Instagram: @don_lanning

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twoeyestwohands

Industry Speaks: Jamie Kelman

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Contributor: Jarrell Mosely

If you arrived late to Make-up designory’s Industry Speaks spotlighting Jamie Kelman (http://www.fleshycreatures.com/), finding an empty seat was not going to be easy. The crowd of MUD graduates, students and staff were unquestionably there to see Kelman and understandably so. He’s a skillful special make-up effects artist, an inspiration and a superb storyteller. This can be seen in his special make-up effects work seen in movies such as Looper, Oz the Great and Powerful and Star Trek: Into Darkness. It was also evident in the way he masterfully told an inspirational, and at times comedic, story of how he went from a thirteen year old doing special effects make-up in his basement to a two-time Emmy award winning make-up artist.

It didn’t take much prodding for Kelman to open up about his career as make-up artist and his love for special effects make-up which began as a three year old watching Star Trek for the first time. “I’m a Star Wars kid,” Kelman stated. “I saw it and the world just opened up before my eyes,” he smiled as he revisited the childhood memory. “I believe that’s where it all started for me.”

When asked about his first job Kelman replied, “I have to thank my uncle for that,” and then vividly recounted the day his uncle, a producer of New York’s Shakespeare in the Park, had taken him to an FX studio when he was just a teenager. “I started working in the studio. I swept the floors and did other odd jobs around the shop.” He reflected. “But I learned so much and it was also where I got my first job working on the 1990’s show Monsters.” Almost as if he didn’t believe so much time had passed he added, “I was only sixteen years old.”

He continued the time line of his career. “After that I studied film at NYU but I always wanted to move to L.A.” and without pause he added, “L.A. is just where it’s at,” referring to opportunities for the up and coming special FX artist.

“Do you think going to school helped you in your career,” Devrill Weekes asked.

The answer came quickly. “I do. School is a great way to dip your toe in the water. You learn a lot from the people around you. You may find a new technique. I always learned from the people that were around me.”

Since, you mentioned that,” Weekes said leading into his next question. “Who was your mentor?”

“I had many,” he said and then took a brief moment to ponder on their names. “Matthew Monge for sure. He gave me my first job on Monsters and I learned so much from him and John Jackson. Dick Smith and Rick Baker of course and Steve Proudy. Definitely Katzu.”

“What is advice would you give to a make-up artist that are just starting?”

He replied. “Make it work.” Stop, step back and take a breath. If something isn’t working don’t keep doing it. If you can, make it better.” It sounded like age old advice you would receive from an elder and it made perfect since.

“Do you have a philosophy or a personal mantra?”

“Nobody wants to works with mean people.” He replied and the audience was enveloped by laughter. “I try to be nice. I try to have fun and I try to enjoy it.” His advice resonated with many in the room.

He continued to impart his words of advice. “I would also say protect your passion.” He said before adding, “Keep your passion alive because once it dies you may not be able to turn it back on.

A hand in the audience shot into the air with urgency. “How do you balance your work with your personal life,” asked a front row MUD student.

“I have a 10 year old and I’m married. I make time for them. When you start out take everything you can but don’t stay apart for more than 8 weeks. After that scandalous things start to happen,” He laughed. “You have to remember what’s important, which means sometimes you may have to say no. It’s also important that you know when and how to say no.

Other eager hands flew up. “What was your biggest challenge?”

The question required some thought. “I would have to say that beauty make-up was my biggest challenge. But I realized that you have to embrace what you fear the most so I started practicing beauty make-up. When I was working on The Grinch that Stole Christmas none of the guys wanted to do beauty make-up so they came to me.”

The questions began to come quickly. “What are some of the critical mistakes you’ve seen a new make-up artist make?”

“Trying to fly under the radar is the biggest mistake a new make-up artist can make. You have to make yourself known. You have to be on the radar. Now you have social media like Facebook so you can post your work.” He answered but shortly added words of caution and food for thought. “But people are posting everything on the internet. Only post what’s good. It’s better to have five great pieces of work than ten ok pieces.”

“Any advice for establishing relationships with a mentor?”

Reach out to them. You can find them on the internet and on Facebook. Send them a respectful email. Try hard to be helpful but stay out of the easy and learn. You’ll find that most people are willing to help you.”

“What’s on your goals list,” an enthusiastic voice asked from the crowd.

“I don’t have a goals list.” He answered. “I love what I do and I’ve had an amazing career. I’m living my dream. You’re lucky for the opportunities. Just grab them.”

And with those final words Jamie Kelman ended his interview and the audience erupted with applause. Without question he’d left an undeniable impression and left many words to ponder on later, words that would undoubtedly resurface during the careers of the make-up artist following in his footsteps.

MUD at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Contributor: Stacia McCarthy

The Art Institute of New York City partnered with  Make-up Designory to debut their Spring 2015 designs at New York’s prestigious Mercedes Benz fashion week.  The two schools were in good company, earlier in the day the tents featured names like Tory Burch, Badgley Mischka, and Pamela Roland to name a few. The festivities took place at 8pm on September 9, 2014 at Lincoln Center.

Doors opened at about 7:30pm and the seats began to fill with fashion enthusiast all eager to see what the students had come up with. The show included 13 designers from the Art Institute with over 20 models (male and female) all prepared by MUD Make-up artists. The designers’ creations featured a wide range of bright colors with an eclectic mix of textiles and patterns.

Lead Make-up artist keying for the 3rd time was MUD Graduate Jackie Caruso.  Jackie managed a team of 17 Make-up artists who are also MUD affiliates.  She describes her vision for the show, explaining that the idea was to create a clean-faced look with contouring, a wet smoky eye and dramatic brows. All of the make-up artists used MUD products including; the eggplant purple lipstick, the Brownstone eye shadow, and the Ice eye shadow. The look also incorporated eyelashes which MUD happily donate.

The event was coordinated by MUD’s Assistant Director Brenna Belardinelli. Make-up artist were selected by Brenna based on proficiency and experience. Participants have a range of expertise in both fashion and beauty make-up application due to skills they have honed at MUD. Participating in such an event is undoubtedly a resume builder and a great way to network with other industry professionals. Current MUD students even got in on the action; Tatiana Muñoz an international student from Colombia is currently enrolled in the Master make-up artistry program and participated for the first time.

As another Fashion Week wraps we would like to congratulate our grads on a job well-done!

Industry Speaks: Ashley Joy Beck

Having worked on everything from Cirque du Soleil to Fashion Editorials and Music Videos (the list of credits goes on and on) Miss Beck returns to MUD after graduating from the Special Make-up Effects Course in 2008.

She visited MUD to demonstrate her “DreamWeaver” character that was inspired by the Native American dream catcher and an ethereal sunset on the final scene in the movie Matrix 3. Her character appears to help you analyze your dreams so that you learn more about yourself.

Enjoy this step-by step make-up demo that was completed in an impressive 45 minutes.

Ashley, everyone at MUD thanks you for visiting the school and inspiring our students, staff and guests with your passion for art.

See more of Ashley’s beautiful work on http://www.ashleyjoybeck.com/

Click on the photos for more information on each step!

Remembering Dick Smith

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“Dick Smith died last night…”

The first words I hear from my wife as I roll awake. I lay there trying to digest the words and acknowledge the emotional impact that will befall me, my friends, my students, my peers, my heroes and my industry. I never knew the man well enough to call him a friend. We shared many handshakes, a meal with friends and some kind words. I will forever be remorseful for not taking a moment to ask for a photo commemorating the memory of such an iconic man.

To his closest friends, colleagues and family, I have no words, only a ball of emotion that rolls through my throat, to my eyes then to sink back into the pit of my stomach leaving me feel empty and hollow. I knew what it was like to lose a father, and that’s who Dick was to many people in our industry. The rest of us knew him as a legend, a hero, the “Godfather of Make-up” as he was called, and we knew him as a teacher.

As a teacher, Dick Smith became a symbol of sharing, of guidance, of support, of professionalism, of talent… his work became the very defining marker by which so many make-ups were compared. His contributions and influence on the lives of generations of make-up artists will continue to reshape and define future generations of artists, artists who will never have known or met the man, but will be better artists because of the foundations he laid.

Thank you Dick Smith for being an inspiration to our heroes. Thank you Dick Smith for being my hero. Thank you for your humility and the positive influence you had on so many, many lives.

With sincere admiration and deepest regrets,

Gil Romero
MUD School Director

“What can I say? I loved him. He was a giving, generous, open, kind, amazing human being. He wanted to feed your passion for make-up, he wanted to help you do great work. I remember when I was 13 I asked Dick for his ager stipple formula. I called him on the phone and he was so kind. He went out of his way to make copies of the formula and sent it to me. You can’t find a single person that hasn’t been touched by his kindness. I really can’t put it into words. He’s a legend.”
Chad Washum, MUD Faculty

“Words are so inadequate to relay our thoughts about our dear friend, Dick Smith, and the sympathy and loss we feel on his passing. Not only did the industry lose its foremost innovator and unselfish proponent. But, the world has lost the epitome of kindness, warmth and humility. He has left an indelible mark in our hearts. Our greatest memories are the many times we just listened to his eloquent commentary of his unbelievable life at the many dinners we shared with him. We’ll miss him dearly. So long, Dick. ”
Andre’ & Jenny DiMino (ADM Tronics)

A forefather to his industry and craft. His mark was left on us all. He will forever be missed and never be forgotten. His gifts will surpass his physical life and his talents will surpass us all.
Much Respect Mr Smith
KarrieAnn Sillay, MUD Faculty

Your passion for make-up and sharing your knowledge is your legacy.
Paul Thompson, MUD Director of Education

As a teacher I see Dick Smith’s iconic imagery continue to influence new generations of make-up artists. Though the artist will be missed, the art lives on.
Lisa Leveridge, MUD Faculty