Actor, Writer, Producer David Dastmalchian Speaks with Students at MUD Industry Speaks

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David Dastmalchian came to Make-Up Designory’s Burbank campus for an interview in front of students with Deverill Weeks. He shared some of the secrets of success to being a working and well respected make up artist in the film and television industry. He offered three simple rules. First, the right make-up helps the actor create the character. David believes that if the make-up is right, the character flows from there. He says that character development is 90% from the outside in, and that hair and make-up help a great deal with character development. Secondly, remember that the make-up artist is the first one the actors will be with during the day, and that the make up artist really sets the energy for the actor for the day. So be positive, professional, calming, and create an environment that lets the actor feel safe and comfortable. This will be a great help in keeping the production on schedule. Finally, do not complain. Actors and others may start complaining about the conditions, the producers, other actors, or the long day. Do not fall into the bad habit of complaining. Be empathetic and understanding, but not negative. Keep the energy positive and move on to another subject. This will keep the actors and the set more productive.

David Dasmalchian, who is co-staring alongside Paul Rudd in the upcoming film Ant-Man, has an impressive body of work. He was in The Dark Night, Prisoners, Employer, and many stage productions. He was raised in Kansas and grew up loving special effects make-up and comic books. Throughout his life, movies were an escape. He was on his way to college to play football when he became heavily involved in theater. He started acting professionally in Chicago, and then headed to Hollywood where he has been doing well ever since. He is now married with his first child. He recently co-wrote and produced his first feature length film, Animal, which is being released in theaters nationwide in May. The make-up on that film was expertly done by MUD grad Amber Talarico. Look for details, of the movie release and his Q&A sessions at the premiers, on the MUD Facebook pages.

Students had a great opportunity to hear first hand from a well known actor about how important make up is to character development and to setting the mood of the actor on the set. His closing advice was find your marketable strengths and spend time with people you respect and want to be like.

Industry Speaks: Make-up Artist Kenny Myers

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What do you get when you leave a napping mother around a 5 year who is more interested in mommy’s makeup bag than he is about sleepy time? An Artisan Award winner and three-time Emmy nominee for make-up, that’s what. Kenny Myers, known for his work on The Prestige (2006), X Men: The Last Stand (2006), Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (2007) and The Last Samurai (2003) graced MUD students and industry friends with insight on his journey as a make-up artist in the film industry.

While his story has great twists and turns, a few nuggets of wisdom appeared with every tale. For aspiring artists looking forward to their own journey, Myers shared professional advice that can be used in whatever path one takes.

“Innovation comes from every direction” Myers shared with the room full of wide eyes. The next big thing is always on the horizon and can come based on the smallest thing. Even when you’re working late at night, that one new “thing” can happen.

“Don’t be afraid of showing what you know. It WILL come back to you.” As the artist began talking about how techniques of Dick Smith had come alive from one project, it’s apparent that the genius of Smith has lived on throughout the face of make-up artistry today.

For artists that are ripe into the industry, Myers advises, “Your job isn’t to show off. It is to bring your skillset to who you work for.” People know that you’re good, that’s why you’re there. Do the job and save the sales pitch.

MUD thanks Kenny Myers and his family for joining us for such an insightful Industry Speaks and we look forward to seeing you around the MUD campus again soon. You can find a more detailed look into the eyes of the artist soon in an upcoming edition of MUD Art, with photographer and writer, Deverill Weeks.

NY Fashion Week 2015

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Make-up Designory joined forces with the Fashion Design students from the Art Institute of New York City for another successful fashion show last night. Doors opened to the public at 8pm but we were backstage to give Twitter followers the inside scoop at 7pm with MUD’s first ever live tweet session! First, we caught up with the Key Makeup Artist Jackie Caruso who explained her vision for the makeup concept. “Being that this was a Mercedes-Benz Spring/Summer fashion show, I wanted the makeup to be fresh and clean with a pop of color”. Jackie used MUD’s Deco eye shadow in teal blue and MUD 107 Lashes which were generously donated by MUD Cosmetics in order to achieve the desired look.

Backstage was hectic to say the least as the makeup artist scrambled to apply the makeup,while working cohesively with the hair and nail teams to prepare the models. Soon it was time for final looks. Suddenly, Jackie explained to everyone that the models were looking “a bit too shiny” so she advised her team to quickly apply the MUD Matte powder to contain the gleam.

The makeup team featured members of MUD Studio New York, MUD Alumni, and even current MUD students!  We would like to Recognize a particular MUD Alumna for her participation in this event. Nicole Elle Rogers is a 2012 graduate of MUD’s Fashion program and has been involved in the make-up and fashion industry for years. She’s already a seasoned pro at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week as last night was her 4th season!  Stay tuned for a full article and interview with this amazing MUD-trained Makeup Artist!

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This Fashion Week was especially dear to us as well as other fashion enthusiasts because it is the last year the shows will be sponsored by Mercedes-Benz. Mercedes-Benz announced that after five years it will no longer be affiliated with NY Fashion Week. We are eager to see where next season’s Fashion Week will be held!

We would like to congratulate our MUD Makeup artists on an incredible show and another job well done!


Article written by Stacia McCarthy
MUD New York

2015 Make-up Artists and Hairstylists Guild Award Nominees Announced

Congratulations to all of the 2015 Make-up Artists and Hairstylists Guild Award nominees!

We would like to recognize and congratulate MUD alumna Essie Cha on her nomination for Best Contemporary Make-up in Television Media Series from AMC’s  The Walking Dead, MUD alumna Sarah B. Wolfe on her nomination for Best Make-up in Theatrical Productions (Live Stage) for Kinky Boots and finally, congratulations to MUD Faculty Member Vanessa Dionne for her nomination for Best Make-up and Best Hair Stylist in Theatrical Productions (Live Stage) for Così fan tutte.

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Industry Speaks: Make-up Artist Jordu Schell

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Contributor: Svenya Nimmons

They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, but in the case of Jordu Schell, what frightens you, makes you create an imagination of your own.  At a young age, he gasped at an image of someone being chased in a movie and his mother quickly shut the television off.  Fearful and curious, the artist-to-be was then left to imagine what the creature looked like.

His curiosity continued as he began experimenting with masks during his youth, landing him at a tradeshow in Chicago where he was the first boutique mask maker showcasing his works.  The rest is history.

With such credits as Alien Resurrection, Men in Black, Avatar and Edward Scissorhands, this industry vet has 30 years of experience in painting, sculpting and designing. You can find him at work in his studio in Chatsworth, CA.  His lovely and talented assistant Emily Deroski helps with sculpting and her attitude of just showing up to do whatever is needed for the day is admirable.  Plus, she’s great with auto mechanics which adds to her cool factor.

So what makes an awesome character?  According to Schell, a well-crafted piece with an expansive imagination of form really brings it home. His advice as an artist looking to be taken seriously in the industry is quite simple: Be prepared for whatever opportunity comes your way with a website, business cards and a knack for networking that shows your genuine interest in what you do. “You’re not entitled to anything and the world owes you nothing,”- great advice from the guy from Philly that learned to love horror films in a way that has shaped his career.

As always, we are immensely grateful to Jordu and all of our  guests who give their time, knowledge and expertise to help our students through this diverse industry!

Industry Speaks: Don Lanning

 

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“If you feel you are an artist, you owe it to yourself to be an artist.” Don Lanning

Don Lanning was born in Van Nuys, California in the heart of Hollywood’s creature effects community. With early heroes Dick Smith, John Chambers, Stan Winston, Rick Baker and Rob Bottin as guides, Don started sculpting creatures at 10 years old. Don is known for his consistent ability to deliver the highest quality work at lightning speed on projects from conservative realism to the archetypes of horror, fantasy, and science fiction.

As our Industry Speaks guest last night, Don took us through his career—a career that got started 10 years after his initial opportunity. He told the story of meeting Dick Smith at age 17. Mr. Smith being a helpful mentor to many artists, was also there for Don, giving him the phone numbers to people who might help him get his start in the industry that held his heart and passion. But, there was something, or someone else who held Don’s heart and passion—a girl—and Don chose a career in real estate, perhaps assuming a steadier path. After 10 years, Don took a good look at himself and didn’t recognize the person he saw. He described it as feeling like he was in someone else’s clothing, living someone else’s life.

Shortly thereafter, he had the opportunity to sculpt for a commercial. It was during that process wherein he acknowledged his calling. He said, “I was found.”

Don’s story was the premise for the rest of the evening’s conversation as he encouraged MUD students to stick to their dreams. “If you feel you are an artist, you owe it to yourself to be an artist…you are the most beautiful when you are creating…art is the only thing worth doing.”  While Don shared his impressive portfolio, the true inspiration may have been in the pep talk he gave for living the life you want.

Don has recently received high praise entering the world of fine art with his modern take on pop icons Batman & The Joker and his elaborate reimagining of The Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, and Tinman from “OZ.” His work is featured in more than 50 motion pictures and he continues to live out his passion, recently opening up a shop in Van Nuys, California.

Don’t miss out on these valuable opportunities extended to you to meet and speak with industry pros at our weekly Industry Speaks events. Our monthlyevent calendar can be found on our facebook page: facebook.com/mudschools

Don Lanning Instagram: @don_lanning

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twoeyestwohands

Day of the Dead Make-up Tutorial

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Dia De Los Muertos

Contributor: Briana Perkins, MUD Make-up Artist In our recent Free Saturday Workshop held at MUD NY and MUD LA (See Eventbrite Calendar for upcoming workshops) we created a colorful skull make-up  that is widely used in the Dia de los Muertos Celebrations, a Mexican tradition dated back to the time of the Aztecs and Halloween. Festivities are held to honor dead loved ones with offerings of food, sugar skulls, marigolds and altars, taking place between October 31 through November 2. Learn more about the Dia de los Murertos tradition: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_of_the_Dead In case you missed the live event, we recreated the look in a step-by-step pictorial below. (1) First, prep the skin with MUD’s Face Primer. This will help the cream products to glide on evenly. (2) Next, cover the entire face with the white cream from the Character FX Wheel and then powder with Zero Loose Powder and #720 Brush to set the cream. (3) Using MUD’s Cake Eyeliner in black and the 900# Brush, start to outline the different designs desired for the face. Don’t worry if the designs aren’t perfect because this will blend nicely with the eye colors. (The #900 brush is amazing for this kind of detail work!) (4) Begin coloring in the design with the eye colors. The colors I chose for this look are: Sugared Violet, Voodoo, Velvetine, Onyx and Daisy.  The #800 & # 810 brushes are amazing for blending the colors together and for smudging away any harsh lines. Have fun and be playful with colors; day of the dead is all about the décor and multitude of colors. (Tip: If you use the eye colors wet it will intensify the look even further) (5) Use MUD’s Eye Pencil in  black to outline the petals around the eyes. If you want to bump up this look further, you can glue gems around this area using Duo eyelash glue. (6) Using Velvetine (or the color of your choice) use the #510 Brush to contour your cheekbones, temples and forehead. (7) Finish the look with filigree again using the cake liner and #900 brush. The more detailed the better! (8) A Dia de Los Muertos look wouldn’t be complete without a floral headdress. Dress it up however you would like and celebrate a day to honor all our loved ones that have passed. Feliz Dia de los Muertos! ~Briana

MUD at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week

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Contributor: Stacia McCarthy

The Art Institute of New York City partnered with  Make-up Designory to debut their Spring 2015 designs at New York’s prestigious Mercedes Benz fashion week.  The two schools were in good company, earlier in the day the tents featured names like Tory Burch, Badgley Mischka, and Pamela Roland to name a few. The festivities took place at 8pm on September 9, 2014 at Lincoln Center.

Doors opened at about 7:30pm and the seats began to fill with fashion enthusiast all eager to see what the students had come up with. The show included 13 designers from the Art Institute with over 20 models (male and female) all prepared by MUD Make-up artists. The designers’ creations featured a wide range of bright colors with an eclectic mix of textiles and patterns.

Lead Make-up artist keying for the 3rd time was MUD Graduate Jackie Caruso.  Jackie managed a team of 17 Make-up artists who are also MUD affiliates.  She describes her vision for the show, explaining that the idea was to create a clean-faced look with contouring, a wet smoky eye and dramatic brows. All of the make-up artists used MUD products including; the eggplant purple lipstick, the Brownstone eye shadow, and the Ice eye shadow. The look also incorporated eyelashes which MUD happily donate.

The event was coordinated by MUD’s Assistant Director Brenna Belardinelli. Make-up artist were selected by Brenna based on proficiency and experience. Participants have a range of expertise in both fashion and beauty make-up application due to skills they have honed at MUD. Participating in such an event is undoubtedly a resume builder and a great way to network with other industry professionals. Current MUD students even got in on the action; Tatiana Muñoz an international student from Colombia is currently enrolled in the Master make-up artistry program and participated for the first time.

As another Fashion Week wraps we would like to congratulate our grads on a job well-done!

MUD Alumni on Face Off Season 7

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Contributor: Stacia McCarthy, MUD NY

MUD Celebrates the premier of the Syfy show Face Off which featured two of its Graduates. Honorees were Rachael Wagner a 2012 graduate of MUD’s Master Make-up Artistry Program and Stella Sensel a 2012 graduate also from the Master Make-up Artistry Program.

The event took place this Wednesday evening at Novecento a trendy bistro in the heart of Soho, New York. More than 50 people were in attendance including MUD Students, Alumni and Staff. The celebration was organized by MUD New York’s Career Services team Brenna Belardinelli and Marissa Green.

To begin the celebration School Director Marc Scoleri introduced the guests of honor while attendees enjoyed cocktails and appetizers. Later in the evening the season 7 premier of Face Off was shown on a large projector screen while guest mingled and congratulated the guests of honor.

Congratulations Rachael and Stella! We look forward to watching you this season!

Watch Face Off on SyFy every Tuesday at 8/9c and keep up with #teamMUD @stellasensel @makeupwager

Check out photos, comments and updates on Twitter@mudschools Facebook @mudschools and Instagram @makeupdesignory

Industry Speaks: Special Make-up FX Artist Norman Cabrera

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“Never be discouraged…” This was just one of many pieces of advice that Norman Cabrera gave to a room full of peers, fans, MUD students, graduates, and aspiring make-up artists attending Make-up Designory’s Industry Speaks. With over 20 years of special make-up FX experience and a resume that is just as tall as he is, it was certain that this advice would leave a lasting impression and serve as food for thought for those who were hungry to hear more about Norman’s roadmap to a career as one of the most sought after special make-up FX artists.

It was an informal gathering, almost like having a beer with an old friend — discussing work, family and the thing you loved most, in this case FX make-up. “I want this to be informal, like a chat,” he said, and encouraged the crowd to throw out questions as he talked. The first being, “How did you get started?”

His eyes lit up behind dark frame tinted glasses and with a reflective smile he began to talk about his start and journey as a make-up artist. “I’ve always loved monsters and make-up FX. I was obsessed with it,” he started. “I remember watching Planet of the Apes and it blew my mind. After seeing Rick Baker’s work I knew that was what I wanted to do.” He continued as he flipped through youthful pictures of himself surrounded by pictures of Return of The Jedi posters and masks he created. “I was sculpting by the age of 14. At 16 I, built up the courage to show people my work, and when I was 17 I sent Rick Baker pictures of my work.”

Realizing this was a teachable moment he briefly deviated from his story and took a minute to plant a seed of wisdom. “Always have something to show,” he advised. “Building your portfolio is one of the most important things you can do. No one is going to hire you if you don’t have anything to show them,” he added with a tone that was high-spirited yet still conveyed the importance of what he was saying.

Pens feverishly jotted down the tidbit of advice before Norman resumed telling the story of how he started his career. His moment of reflection took the attentive audience on a journey through his work and his experiences working on films like Hell Boy I and II, Drag Me To Hell, and Men in Black 3. He talked about his work with directors like and Guillermo Del Toro and fx make-up artists like Rick Baker, who had inspired and mentored him throughout his career.

“So, you knew beyond a hobby that this is what you wanted to do?” Gil Romero, School Director, asked.

Without hesitation and with a confidence supported by talent and years of experience, he answered, “For sure. I would always read magazines and I searched through the TV Guide looking for anything that had to do with make-up.” He talked about working in a supermarket as a teenager and saving his money to buy latex so that he could make masks.

“So, is the passion still there,” an enthusiastic audience member asked.

“Absolutely,” he answered quickly and assuredly. “I think about this stuff all the time. I’m always working on something. He then took another second to impart advice to the listening audience. “It’s important to always keep working. Do more stuff. Every waking moment you should be working on something.” He paused for a second and then added. “And always keep learning. Just as important as building your book you have to keep learning.” His words resonated with the crowd. But the wisdom coming from years of experience did not stop there. “Keep learning. Study anatomy,” he said adamantly. “Study all the creatures of the earth. You can find ideas and inspiration in all of this.” It was simplistic but still profound advice.

As Norman continued to talk about his experiences the audience hung on his every word, some writing them down hurriedly while others simply nodded in agreement. Before wrapping up his informal chat, he left them with some final words of advice. “I can’t stress enough how important it is to build your book. You have to have a kick ass book. This is a competitive industry but never be discouraged to follow what you want to do.”

As I wrote down these final words of advice I realized Norman’s gems of wisdom could be applied to all aspects of life. I recognized the motivation stirring in the room and the sense of inspiration emanating from the crowd. Just like the line waiting to shake hands and take pictures with Norman Cabrera, I left not only feeling the urge do more, but believing that I could. “Never be discouraged,” I thought as I scribbled the last notes before I closed my notepad. Wise words indeed.

— Jarrell Mosley