The Nominees are in… 2018 Emmys

It’s mid-July, and you know what that means: Emmys Season! Last week, this year’s nominees were announced, and we are prouder than ever of all the amazing MUD grads who made the list. Recognized for their work on Game of Thrones, GLOW, Ru Paul’s Drag Race, and more, here’s all the MUD grads that were nominated this year:

emmys2Photo: Associated Press

Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Limited Series, Movie or Special

Emma Faulkes, Special Makeup Effects Artist

Game Of Thrones • The Dragon And The Wolf • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with Bighead, Littlehead; 360, Television/Startling Television

 

Outstanding Makeup for a Single-Camera Series (Non-Prosthetic)

Melissa Buell, Makeup Artist

Kristina Frisch, Makeup Artist

GLOW • Money’s In The Chase • Netflix • Glitter Pictures, LLC

 

Outstanding Makeup for a Multi-Camera Series or Special (Non-Prosthetic)

Nicole Faulkner, Makeup Artist

Jen Fregozo, Makeup Artist

RuPaul’s Drag Race • 10s Across The Board • VH1 • World of Wonder Productions

 

Gina Ghiglieri, Makeup Artist

The Voice • Live Finale, Part 1 • NBC • MGM Television, Talpa Media USA, Inc., Warner Horizon Unscripted & Alternative Television

 

Outstanding Makeup for a Limited Series or Movie (Non-Prosthetic)

Carleigh Herbert, Additional Makeup Artist

American Horror Story: Cult • FX Networks • Twentieth Century Fox Television

 

Melissa Buell, Makeup Artist

The Last Tycoon • Oscar, Oscar, Oscar • Prime Video • TriStar Television, Inc. and Amazon Studios

 

Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Limited Series, Movie or Special

Carleigh Herbert, Additional Makeup Artist

American Horror Story: Cult • FX Networks • Twentieth Century Fox Television

 

Hugo Villasenor, Special Makeup Effects Artist

Star Trek: Discovery • Will You Take My Hand? • CBS (CBS All Access) • CBS Television Studios / Secret Hideout / Roddenberry Entertainment

 

Outstanding Hairstyling for a Limited Series or Movie

Natalie Driscoll, Key Hairstylist

The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story • FX Networks • Fox 21 Television Studios and FX Productions

 

Congratulations to all that are nominated! 

Product Focus: Smitten Kit

Are you looking for someone fun and flirty, with a little bit of an adventurous side? A girl you can take out to a high-class dinner or for some fun in the sun? Then look no further, because I’ve found you the perfect date. Let me introduce you to our newest palette, Smitten.

A stunning collection of six eyeshadows and one lip glaze, Smitten is a versatile palette with all the shades you need to get on board with the mauve trend. One side has three rich berry colors, while the other contains three blushing neutrals. The full set gives you the ability to go from day to night, or from editorial to more conservative looks in the bat of a eyelash.

A die-hard lover of solid washes of color, my go-to looks are a single swipe of the soft camel brown eye color, Chamois, or rich burgundy eye color Berrywood all over the lid from lash to crease. To spice up either look, I’ll smudge Vineyard, a warm, shimmering burgundy wine eye color along the upper lash line, or along the bottom rim of the eye as a drop shadow. If you have green or hazel eyes, you’re especially in luck–the brighter mauve or purple you go with these shades, the more these contrasting colors will make your eyes pop.

Another route you can take is with the more wearable nude shades, Galaxy, Cashmere, and Chamois. Together or separate, the three can make a variety of pleasant every-day looks, appropriate for business or a friendly family gathering. However, all three can easily be taken into the nighttime with the bright purple shade Velvetine, either applied with water or liquiset as a liner or smudged along the lower lash line. The shocking shade works surprisingly well with the kit’s tamest colors, opening you up to hundreds of looks. 

However, my favorite product in this kit is the nude lip glaze, Bare. Though our lip glazes might not look like the most exciting, I can’t emphasize enough how luxurious this formulation feels on the lips. Buttery and moisturizing, the lip glazes have a sheer pigment and a lot of movement–avoiding the sticky finish their industry counterparts often have. With its subtle sugary scent and wearable tone, this shade is perfect for a night out or a kiss on the lips. Needless to say–I’m totally Smitten! 

MUD’s Smitten Kit can be purchased here.

MUD Talks: An Interview with Vincent Van Dyke

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Vincent Van Dyke is an industry leader in special make-up effects. Getting his first job at just 14 years old, Vincent Van Dyke has gone on to work on TV shows and movies like I Tonya, Darkest Hour, Code Black, and Dexter. Acting as the owner and creative director of Vincent Van Dyke Effects at only 28 years old, Vincent Van Dyke has now moved to the Burman studio space where he learned the tools of the trade.

Despite being so much younger than his peers, Vincent Van Dyke says his career has always progressed in “gradual baby steps.” From experimenting with a make-up kit at six years old, to introducing himself to Barney Burman at an FX supply store, to working with Kazu on Darkest Hour, Vincent Van Dyke’s career has blossomed in a way many young make-up artists can only dream of. We spoke with him about approaching your make-up artist idols, living your passion, and knowing when to take your next big career step.

MUD: What was the defining moment when you knew you wanted to be a make-up artist?

VINCENT: That’s such a hard question for me because it goes back so far. My step-dad was a huge film aficionado, so he was really big into old black and white silent movies and all that stuff. I remember one night in particular I was going to bed and he had the original Hunchback playing and I was mesmerized by it. I could barely go to sleep because I was like ‘oh my god I want to do that!’ When I woke up in the morning I got my little makeup kit out and I duplicated that makeup on myself. I don’t remember when I first got this little kit or how I put it together, but I had it already. That was one of those moments where I got silly putty and I got a pillow and I shoved it in my back and I made this little face. It was really a fun make-up to do. There’s a picture of it somewhere that my mom has I’m sure.

MUD: How old were you?

VINCENT: I was probably six when I did that–that’s what’s weird. I had no idea what I was doing; I just knew it was fun. My mom would always be so encouraging and so supportive. I would say “how does this person look like this?” And she would go “oh well it’s makeup and I don’t really know how to answer that question, honey.” My association with makeup was what my mom put on her face so I was like “well that doesn’t make any sense!”

MUD: I read online that you were reading a lot of books and watching a lot of videos about special make-up effects early on. Which ones in particular?

VINCENT: I was reading a lot of Vincent Kehoe’s Special Make-Up Effects. It’s funny because I found it recently and it has all these little highlighted notes and post-its. It looks like a textbook, you know? The internet was in its absolute infancy, so I was literally going through books and getting VHS tapes. Michael Burnett had a line of VHS tapes that were huge for me. I watched those over and over and over again.

MUD: You met Barney Burman at an FX supply store, correct?

VINCENT: He was there shopping and I showed him my portfolio, and maybe six months after that he gave me a job. It was my first internship, which was amazing. Then later on, maybe one and a half or two years after that, I went over to Tom and Bari Burman’s shop. That was when my career took off. You know, you have your job and then you have like your career. It was really like they honed me in and guided my eye. I can’t imagine any other company ever doing that for me. I was so, so lucky to have fell into that position at that time in that month and the universe–just everything aligned and it just worked amazingly.

 

MUD: What was it like working that young?

VINCENT: Oh it’s ridiculous! It’s weird to be paid for something that you absolutely love. I think that’s honestly still hard for me to grasp, because so many people have to work to live but when you live to work and you really just have this amazing passion that you get paid for–that’s so rare. It was hard for me to fathom like ‘oh I’m getting a paycheck for playing with the stuff that I played with already for so many years as a little kid.’

MUD: I bet that a lot of people reading this will wonder how you were able to just strike up a conversation with a potential employer. Do you have any tips for approaching a big make-up artist?

VINCENT: I always had my portfolio with me. So no matter where I went, especially if I was going to a make-up store, I always had a little portfolio. You never know who you’re going to run into. I would just go up to them and say ‘hey, I know who you are, and I would love to show you my portfolio. I hate to interrupt you.’ I can’t imagine anybody in this business going ‘I don’t have time for this like get out of my face.’ Everyone’s going to take a minute to look at your portfolio, especially if you’re coming up to them, and you’re polite, and you’re just asking for them to look at your stuff, not asking for a job. I wasn’t really thinking about having a job.

MUD: When did you know that you wanted to have your own studio?

VINCENT: It’s funny because I think a lot of people maybe discover that they want their own studio after working for people, but I knew from when I was little. I really loved this stuff, and I knew that one day (I just thought it was going to be when I was 50), I want to be able to have the stuff produced under my roof be something I’m really proud of. When it happened I had no idea that I was ready for it. I don’t think you ever know that you’re ready for a move like that. But the way that everything had aligned–I had been working at the Burman’s for around 8 years, and I eventually became their shop supervisor and creative director, and they had really groomed me to be in a position like that. Bari Burman pushed me and my eye so much- really giving me a totally different perspective on the way I approached sculpture and paint. She and Tom are brilliant artists. And Tom Burman had such an ease about everything he did- always thinking outside the box and pushing the boundaries for the “standard” approach. Orchestrating teams, and working with extreme deadlines, I could go on and on but they really made it possible for me to have my own shop. It was a good time for me to be able to get a space and see what happens.

MUD: You’ve said it can be difficult to relinquish creative control once you start expanding. Do you have any advice for delegating tasks or collaborating?

VINCENT: I’ve been really fortunate that all the artists that I hire are all very collaborative. I never feel like somebody’s taking the bull by the horns and just saying like ‘this is how we’re doing it.’ It’s always a conversation of like ‘what’s the best way to get here?’ That was something that was instilled in me from Bari and Tom when I was working with them–like having these discussions and having open ideas of like ‘let’s take ego out of it and look at this situation and figure out the best way to do it.’ That to me is always the answer. Most of the time the answer for me is ‘that guy is way better at this than I am, so he’s going to do this.’ Sometimes it’s ‘I would love to sculpt this right now, but I’ve got my lead Daniele Tirinnanzi.’ He’s been my lead sculptor and painter now for a while, and he’s brilliant, so I always know that he’s going to do these things better than I am and it’s easy for me to relinquish that creative direction.

MUD: What is your favorite thing about your job?

VINCENT: I think that actually is my favorite thing about my job–that collaborative deal–because it’s so nice to be able to work with other artists that I learn from every day. For me the coolest thing is when I get to hire people that I think are so amazing at their job. Because I don’t shop hop around, I’m actually bringing people in that I get to look over their shoulder and learn from.
It’s cool to me when I can go ‘oh, I get to bring in Mitch Devane, who I think is the best sculptor in the business, to sculpt for me and he’s across from my office and I can just look in there and be like ‘wow Mitch Devane is sculpting the most amazing thing right now!’ That to me is kind of the coolest thing.

Thanks for talking with us, Vince!

Product Focus: Lady Bug Lipstick

No make-up look will ever be more classic than a bold, red lip. From Marilyn Monroe to Dita Von Teese to Gwen Stefani, so many iconic women have made red lipstick a mainstay in their make-up bag. That’s why I always reach for MUD’s Lady Bug Lipstick whenever I want to add a pop of color to an otherwise simple look.

While there are many variations on a red lip – from dark to light, from warm to cool, or from matte to glossy – a well-defined, velvety red lip never gets old. Therefore, it’s important to start your lipstick application with our Red Lip Pencil. MUD’s lip pencils provide the perfect happy medium between firm and soft pencil–allowing you to both draw a precise lip line and fill in the lip without any patchiness. Filling in the lip helps create a vibrant color and keeps my lipstick looking even between touch-ups without any bleeding on the lip line.

After lining the lips all you have to do is fill in the lip using MUD’s #310 Lip Brush, and voila! You’re looking like a 1920s movie star. I recommend loading up our Lip Brush with lipstick and throwing it in your purse for touch-ups throughout the day.

I find Lady Bug to be very wearable because it is neither too light or too dark and has a slightly blue undertone. This makes it perfect for a variety of different looks. Rock a thin cat eye and falsies with Lady Bug for a classic vintage look, or pair it with a little mascara and defined brows to finish off a quick on-the-go make-up. The world is your oyster! 

Lady Bug lipstick can be purchased here.

MUD Open House Saturday July 14th

Next Saturday, July 14th, we will be having our annual open house at MUD’s Burbank Location. The event will be from 10:00am to 1:00pm. Prospective students, parents, grads, family, and friends are all encouraged to attend!

We are all familiar with the magic of MUD, but not everybody has had the opportunity to explore our school and see all that we have to offer. At our open house, guests will have the opportunity to visit the campus and cosmetic store, check out our course catalogue, and meet with administrative staff and instructors. Best of all, guests can also see demos by talented artists ranging from beauty to special effects.

We ask that students RSVP by contacting us at 818.729.9420 or responding to the Eventbrite. However, all are welcome! Our next New York open house will be August 24th.

Product Focus: Liquid Foundation

We all know that feeling: it’s officially summer, and you’re ready to spend your day lounging poolside or hanging out at a sunny park with a good book. You put on that cute summer dress you’ve been waiting to wear, and get all made-up with your favorite bright colored lipstick or bronze eyeshadow. You can feel the hot sun tanning your skin. Life is good!

But then, the worst feeling sinks in. You’re taking a selfie in the sun and you see your heavy, cakey foundation clumping up all over your face. Why did nobody tell you sooner?!

Just as summer is a good time to get a great primer, it’s also the perfect time to find a breathable, lightweight foundation. That’s why my favorite summer foundation is MUD’s Liquid Foundation. Available in ten versatile shades, MUD’s Liquid Foundation is suitable for everyone who wants a beautiful, skin-like finish that keeps your skin looking fresh. While the make-up feels lightweight, it is also buildable without being cakey. In fact, there’s been times I have added another layer of foundation under my eyes instead of corrector and maintained an even coverage all day! However, if you prefer the ultra-light coverage of a tinted moisturizer, this foundation can be mixed with a primer to sheer it out even more. When my skin is fairly even I like to buff in a small amount of foundation using the 615 Buffer Brush with a light hand.

On an active summer day, you don’t want to feel like you’re wearing make-up; that’s why MUD’s Liquid Foundation is my absolute favorite for this season. MUD’s Liquid Foundation can be purchased here.

Product Focus: Face Primer

If there’s ever been a best time to look for a good primer, it’s summer. I find that my skin breaks out more in the summer, so making sure I have a good base for my foundations is especially important so that my imperfections stay covered. That’s why I always use MUD’s Face Primer.

Primer is important not only because it sticks to whatever coordinating products you place on top of it, but also because it creates a protective barrier between your skin and your foundation. Our primer is silicone based, which means not only is it compatible with oil and silicone based foundations, but also it’s designed to stay on the surface of the skin to create a smooth, flawless foundation application. To use, just take a very small amount of product (I use about the same amount as a pencil eraser) and smooth it all over the face prior to foundation application.

But primer isn’t just for foundation! On hot summer days, I know I don’t always want to wear a full face of make-up. However, a light layer of primer makes my skin feel soft and silky. I like to make MUD’s primer the last step in my skincare routine to prepare it for make-up no matter how much product I’ll be putting on. Mix it with your foundation or pair it with a little corrector and you’ll have a wonderful, light, everyday summer base.

PRO TIP: Primer can work with powder products too! Mix MUD’s Face Primer with our eye colors, cheek colors, bronzers, or cake eyeliner for more intensity.

When the weather is warm, a lightweight primer is key. Luckily, this primer keeps me covered for a long day out in the sun. MUD’s primer can be purchased at our online store, here.

In Memoriam: David Langford

One year ago today we lost our beloved friend and colleague David Langford. David Langford was known for his work on Elvira: Mistress of the Dark, Jeopardy with Alex Trebek, and The Richard Simmons Show. He also played a role as Department Head at Paramount and Disney, and as a member of I.A.S.T.E. Local 706. Langford was a part of the MUD extended family for years, and taught at our Burbank school since 2010.

“David and I not only shared a love of make-up and teaching that goes back to the late eighties, but we also shared a birthday. He had an enthusiasm and a love of life that was so contagious and I could not help but smile whenever I was around him. He truly cared about his students and whether they succeeded, he and I would often talk about what graduates are doing and how proud he was. He was a teacher, a mentor and a friend that touched so many people in such a positive way that I feel honored to have worked with him and even luckier to call him a friend.”

Paul Thompson, Director of Education

David Langford is survived by Pam, Ryan, and Erin Langford. He is missed dearly by everyone here at MUD.

Read last year’s article here.

Scott Essman and Mark Viniello Discuss Dick Smith’s Legacy for MUD Talks

You might recognize Dick Smith’s name for his work on Little Big Man, Amadeus, or Taxi Driver. Though he won an Oscar in 1985 for Best Makeup and Hairstyling for his work on Amadeus, his peers and proteges guess he would have won many more had the make-up award category even existed before 1981. For this reason, he also won an Academy Honorary Award for his career’s work in 2012.

Photo courtesy of IMATS

Nicknamed “The Godfather of Make-up” throughout the industry, Dick Smith pioneered many of the special make-up effects techniques we use today. The make-up for Little Big Man wasn’t just an old-age make-up, it was an old-age make-up that evolved to show the progression of over 100 years. He didn’t just do static bullet holes for The Godfather, but ones that bled and burst on screen. His make-up on Linda Blair for The Exorcist scared the audience so much, digital experts on movie remakes have attempted to recreate it. And, perhaps most memorably of all, David Bowie was so overwhelmed at the sight of his old age makeup for The Hunger that he left set for a full two days.

Photo courtesy of MonsterMovieKid.com

Writer, producer, and motion picture craftsmanship expert, Scott Essman, and special make-up effects artist, Mark Viniello, both came into contact with Dick Smith in very different ways. Taking up an interest in professional make-up artistry, Scott Essman was led to pursue Smith after hearing his name in interview after interview with other successful make-up artists. Viniello, on the other hand, pursued Smith as an aspiring make-up artist, mailing Smith copies of his work for months before Smith took him on as a student. Both talk about how they had to wear him down before he would take them seriously, contacting him repeatedly for information and advice. However, after years of collaboration, both came to consider Dick Smith a friend. Here are some of the most interesting things we learned:

  1. He’s responsible for multi-piece prosthetics. Back when make-up artists were using foam prosthetics in the 50s, these masks would have to be tugged and stretched to fit the actor’s face because the foam would shrink. This was very difficult and very uncomfortable for the actor because it was so hard to be expressive and move under the prosthetic. “Dick said there’s got to be a better way” says Viniello, “so what Dick reasoned is if there were little sections that overlapped, he could glue it on piece by piece and have a better glue down so the actor would be more comfortable and have more movability.” Now, years later, even though make-up artists all use silicone, Smith’s multi-piece prosthetic technique is still used.

    Photo courtesy of Lucy Amelia Thomas
  2. He was blatantly honest. When Viniello first approached Dick Smith for make-up advice, Smith told him he didn’t have “the skills you need to be a make-up artist.” After wearing him down by sending him continuous letters and photos, Smith eventually acknowledged his “drive” and and agreed to teach him. But, as Viniello says, “he didn’t sugar-coat anything,” and he developed a reputation for refusing to teach people he didn’t think would be worth the time. According to our host, he turned down Guillermo Del Toro as well.

    Photo courtesy of Dick Smith’s Special FX Training
  3. His attention to detail made him successful. When asked what set Dick Smith apart, both Viniello and Essman said it was his attention to detail. “Every wrinkle was based from a wrinkle in a photograph that he had up above his area where he was sculpting” says Essman. Viniello added that “he was never satisfied…not only artistically but also technically. He changed things to suit what he needed.” This attention to detail and perfectionism is likely why all his make-ups looked so real.

    Photo courtesy of Beauty and the Geek

 

 

 

Thanks for all your stories Scott and Mark!

Product Focus: Idol Lipstick

 

Do you turn to a bright red lipstick every time you want a pop of color? Or have you never ventured outside of peaches and nudes? Either way, it might be time to go outside of your comfort zone and pick up a vibrant, purple lip color. Lucky for you, we’ve got you covered with my favorite MUD lipstick, Idol.

Arriving in a rich, magenta-purple shade, Idol stands alone as a strong statement lip that’s flattering on a multitude of skin tones from light to dark. It’s a twist on a deep, vampy lip shade that’s a little bit more purple, but not so bright that it isn’t wearable from day-to-day. We recommend lining the lip with one of our MUD lip pencils before applying with our #310 lip brush for a precise, bold look.

However, don’t think you’re limited to just one look with this color! After strutting my stuff with a rainbow make-up look at pride, I was able to make the look more mature for a family dinner that evening by pairing Idol with a maroon lip liner like our Mahogany or Mauve shade around the edges. Just line the lips and blend in until about halfway with the maroon shade and touch up with Idol in the center for a sultry ombre lip look.

If wearing a lot of product on the lip isn’t your thing, Idol makes for a lovely lip stain as well! Whether you’re going to the beach or trying to tone down your lip shade on your way to the gym like I did, just blot the lipstick evenly for a healthy-looking berry stain.

Versatile and bold, Idol has quickly become a mainstay in my primary make-up bag. It can be worn for a formal occasion, a festival, or even when you want to spice up your everyday make-up. I get compliments whenever I wear it, and I’m sure you will too. 

Idol lipstick can be purchased here.